Adaptive Perspectives on Human-Technology Interaction: Methods and Models for Cognitive Engineering and Human-Computer Interaction

By Alex Kirlik | Go to book overview

Introduction

Alex Kirlik

The introduction of technology into modern work settings is quickly moving well beyond computer interfaces to include various forms of automation geared to gain people's attention, help them make decisions, and so on. The three chapters in this section present studies addressing these issues from the perspective of the lens model, its extensions, and empirical findings on the effects of feedback on human learning and performance. In chapter 7, Pritchett and Bisantz present a study of human interaction with alerting automation in an aviation collision detection task. As was the case with the chapters in the previous section, a more sophisticated than typical version of the lens model had to be created for analysis and modeling, due to the desire to capture the relationships not only between human judgments and a task ecology but also relationships between these entities and a variety of automated alerting algorithms. Using such an nsystem lens model, Pritchett and Bisantz were able to identify the information used (and, just as important, unused) by their participants in making collision detection judgments, and they examine the coherence and lack of coherence between the judgment strategies used by their human participants and those embedded within alerting automation. Their technique has potential applications beyond aviation to include alerting systems in human– computer interaction, automobiles, health care, and the like.

In chapter 8 Seong and colleagues take the matter one step further and consider the situation in which human judgments are not only made in concert with automation but also in part on the basis of the information provided by an automated decision aid. This added layer of complexity leads them to develop a framework using both n-system lens modeling and also hierarchical lens modeling. Of particular interest to Seong and his coauthors is how feedback information (informed by hybrid nsystem/hierarchical lens model analysis) might be used to influence and perhaps calibrate an appropriate level of human trust in decision aids. Factors known to influence trust, such as aid reliability and validity, were manipulated where these measures were grounded in the values of various lens model parameters. In this way they were able to determine that poor aid validity had more severe detrimental effects on human judgments than did poor aid reliability. Interestingly, however, providing participants using aids with poor reliability and/or validity with cognitive feedback (or instruction) on the manner in which the aid functioned (e.g., cue weights, etc.) allowed participants in their poor aid

-89-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Adaptive Perspectives on Human-Technology Interaction: Methods and Models for Cognitive Engineering and Human-Computer Interaction
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 313

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.