Socrates in the Boardroom: Why Research Universities Should Be Led by Top Scholars

By Amanda H. Goodall | Go to book overview

APPENDIX ONE
Data Collection

DATA COLLECTION

Four datasets have been created for this book. They include quantitative and qualitative data. In the quantitative chapters, information has come from public sources. Qualitative data have been acquired through semistructured interviews with a number of university leaders in the United States and United Kingdom, also with members of a committee to hire a UK vice chancellor, and finally, six nonuniversity professionals.


Quantitative Data

Close to four hundred individuals are included in data presented in the statistical chapters—chapters 2, 3, 4, and 6. Data on the presidents of the world's top 100 universities (in chapter 2) were collected in October 2004. Only those presidents in post during this period are included, and to the author's knowledge no presidents changed during the time data were collected. Biographical information on the leaders came from university Web sites; on occasion, direct requests for CVs were made. Data on the 138 business school deans (in chapter 3) were collected in mid-2005. Again, information was mostly acquired through business school Web sites and requests for CVs.

Data on the 157 UK vice chancellors used in chapters 4 and 6 were collected in late 2005. The material was gathered through “Who's Who,” the Association of Commonwealth Universities, and for current vice chancellors, institutional Web sites and CVs. The bibliographic data used in this study come from the Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Knowledge. Information on the Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) results came from official RAE reports published following each assessment (www.rae.ac.uk), and also from the University of Dundee's helpful Web site (www.somis.dundee.ac.uk/rae). My data are available on request.


Qualitative Data

Qualitative data consist of twenty-six interviews with leaders—both university heads and deans—in universities in the United States and the United Kingdom

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