Richard Hofstadter: An Intellectual Biography

By David S. Brown | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The pride of authorship is, at its heart, a shared pleasure. In this particular case, the debts run especially deep. One can find at the close of this book the names of three dozen individuals who favored me with their recollections of Richard Hofstadter. Their words and letters parted many clouds, helping to illuminate a complex subject prone to counter the public demands of academic celebrity with a natural inner reserve. Closer to home, Paul Gottfried and Gabriel Ricci offered collegiality and friendship along with insightful criticisms of an early draft. What they read was largely the fruit of research that could not have been recovered without the generosity of Elizabethtown College and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History. I enjoyed remarkably skillful assistance from a number of archivists and librarians, but I recall with greatest pleasure the cooperation of two individuals. Fred McKitrick kindly allowed me to work in his late father's papers, and Kenneth Stampp trusted me with a splendid cache of Hofstadter letters culled from his private collection. I consider myself more than fortunate that Robert Devens edited this book. He smartly shepherded the manuscript from a rough draft through publication, improving its contents, assuaging the concerns of its author—and this with a certain editorial grace and good humor. In closing stages, James Banner, Jr., Thomas Bender, Eric Foner, Peter Gay, James Gilbert, Michael Kazin, Lawrence Levine, Jack Pole, Dorothy Ross, and the late James Shenton read all or

-xi-

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Richard Hofstadter: An Intellectual Biography
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction - Interior, Exterior xiii
  • Part I - Education, 1916–1950 1
  • 1: Radical Roots 3
  • 2: The Twilight of Waspdom 28
  • 3: The New American Political Tradition 50
  • 4: The Historian as Social Scientist 72
  • Part II - Engagement, 1950–1965 97
  • 5: The Age of Reform and Its Critics 99
  • 6: The Crisis of Intellect 120
  • 7: The Paranoid Mind 142
  • Part III - Eclipse, 1965–1970 161
  • 8: Rebellion from Within 163
  • 9: Conflict and Consensus—redux 188
  • 10: The Trials of Liberalism 207
  • 11: A World Full 222
  • Notes 239
  • Bibliographic Essay - In Search of Richard Hofstadter 267
  • Sources 277
  • Students of Richard Hofstadter 281
  • Index 283
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