Law, Politics, and Morality in Judaism

By Michael Walzer | Go to book overview

Index
Abel, 86
Abi Zimra, Rabbi David ibn, 77
Abner, 156
Agudat Yisrael, 53
Akiba, Rabbi, 150, 158, 191
Amalekites, 156, 161, 192, 200, 202
Amasa, 156
apocalypticism, 51, 131–32. See also messianism
Aquinas, Thomas, 139
Arabs, political status of West Bank, 72
Aramah, Rabbi Yitshak, 176
Aristotle, vii, 40, 57
Artson, B. S., 119n13
aspiration, and duty, 8
Assyrian king, 160
Augustine, 178
authority, political, 93–94
autonomy: Jewish tradition versus, 78–79, 100; liberalism and, 122–23
Babylonian Talmud, 126
Bar Kochba revolt, 150, 154
bar mitzvah, 5
bat mitzvah, 5
Ben-Gurion, David, 49n21
Bentham, Jeremy, 7
Berlin, Rabbi Naftali Tzvi Yehuda, 115
Bible: dying for the state and, 186–90; families and individuals in, 40–41; human community in, 84; ownership in, 59–61; Torah as, 139
Bleich, David, 154, 163, 193–94, 197, 200
Bleich, Rabbi, 126
Blidstein, Gerald, 29, 159
Blidstein, Yaakov, 172
Bloch, Ernst, 143n5
Bodin, Jean, 125
borders. See boundaries boundaries: and access to natural resources, 88–89; communal versus territorial, 79, 83–85; Jewish social, 89; and mobility, 77–78; ownership and, 58–62; significance of, 57
Buber, Martin, 62
Cain, 59–60, 86
Calvin, John, 139
Canaanites, 160, 161, 178, 192, 200, 202
Catholic Church, 123, 159
Chazon Ish. See Karelitz, Rabbi Abraham Yeshayahu
chosenness, 14
Christianity, 123–24, 177
citizenship: Israeli, 71; Judaism and concept of, 41–42, 52, 71
civil society: future Jewish, 25–26; Jewish social order versus, 13–21, 50–51; Judaism and concept of, 12–13, 15, 21–22, 31; Western origins of, 15, 50–51
clothing, in court, 10
coercion, 72
Cohen, Hermann, 23, 71, 136
collectivism: individualism versus, 4, 50; Judaism and, 43
Colloquium heptaplomeres de rerum sublimium arcanis abditis (Bodin), 125
commanded war, 151, 154, 157, 159, 165, 166, 192–95, 202
communal associations, 21
conduct of war, 161–65, 167
conscientious objection, 158
Conservative Judaism, 96
constitution, Israel's lack of, 70
conversion: definition of, 72; emergence of, 69–70; Jewish identity and, 90–91; war of, as forbidden, 152
cosmopolitanism, 141–43. See also international society
covenantal community: basic principles of, 16–17, 73–74; as basis for coherent modern Israel, 79–80; contractual versus, 140–41; and dying for the state, 184–85; interpersonal relations in, 43; political versus, 44; prohibition of idolatry in, 43–44; ritual and, 43
creation: international society and the role of, 134; natural law and, 139
Crito (Plato), 140

-211-

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Law, Politics, and Morality in Judaism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Ethikon Series in Comparative Ethics ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Part I - Political Order and Civil Society 1
  • 1: Obligation 3
  • 2: Judaism and Civil Society 12
  • 3: Civil Society and Government 34
  • 4: Autonomy and Modernity 50
  • Part II - Territory, Sovereignty, and International Society 55
  • 5: Land and People 57
  • 6: Contested Boundaries 83
  • 7: Diversity, Tolerance, and Sovereignty 96
  • 8: Responses to Modernity 121
  • 9: Judaism and Cosmopolitanism 128
  • Part III - War and Peace 147
  • 10: Commanded and Permitted Wars 149
  • 11: Prohibited Wars 169
  • 12: Judaism and the Obligation to Die for the State 182
  • Contributors 209
  • Index 211
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