The Body Economic: Life, Death, and Sensation in Political Economy and the Victorian Novel

By Catherine Gallagher | Go to book overview

INDEX
aesthetics, 2, 28, 30–31, 157; and T. R. Malthus, 156, 157; and modernism, 157
Agnew, Jean-Christophe, 2n1
agriculture, 21, 25–26, 31, 32, 47–49, 50, 98; and human waste, 104; and T. R. Malthus, 98; and John Ruskin, 106, 107
Altick, Richard D., 111n35
anthropology, 2, 4, 157, 167, 191; and art, 167; and classical political economy, 2; comparative, 167, 169, 170, 172, 179, 182, 183, 185, 190; and culture, 156–58, 159, 166, 167, 172, 183, 190; and Charles Darwin, 157–58, 159; and George Eliot, 2, 4, 157, 179, 182; evolutionary, 159, 179, 179, 183; and T. R. Malthus, 156, 157–58, 159, 166, 172, 175, 183, 190; and modernism, 170, 172; and religion, 167; and Scenes of Clerical Life, 157, 172, 179; and sexuality, 167; and E. B. Tylor, 170; and violence, 167
Aristotle, 81
Arnold, Matthew, 170, 171
art, 157, 167, 171; and George Eliot, 179, 181; and T. R. Malthus, 157; and religion, 182; and sacrifice, 171; in Scenes of Clerical Life, 179, 182; and Nassau Senior, 185; and sexuality, 172; and suffering, 182; and symbolism, 171
Bacon, Francis, 187
Bailey, Peter, 77n27
Bain, Alexander, 120–21, 121n5, 122n7, 129n14, 133n18; and desire, 120–21, 122, 127–28; and George Eliot, 120–21, 122–23, 129, 133–34, 138–39, 146–47; and intellect or thought, 121, 133–34, 139, 146; and Richard Jennings, 126, 127–28, 187; and W. S. Jevons, 126, 127–28; and the law of relativity of sensation, 121, 122–23, 126, 127–28, 129, 134; and motivation, 120–21, 129, 133, 138–39, 146; and psychophysiology, 120– 21, 123, 126, 129, 133–34, 187; and the rule of novelty, 134, 151–52; and sensation or feeling, 120–21, 133–34, 138–39, 146; and utilitarianism, 126, 127–28; and wealth, 127–28; and will or volition, 121, 133–34, 139, 146
Baker, Robert S., 111n35
Bank of England, the, 17–18
Barlow, Nora, 158n3
Bauman, Zygmunt, 54n15
Beer, Gillian, 143n24, 174, 174n23
Bentham, Jeremy, 4, 16, 24n25, 65–66, 65n7, 68nn 13 and 15, 84; and Edwin Chadwick, 100; and eudemonism, 16; and William Godwin, 9; and the greatesthappiness principle, 67–69; and Hard Times, 65–66, 67–69; and Richard Jennings, 127–28; and W. S. Jevons, 126–27; and labor, 24, 65–66, 84, 128; and marginal utility theory, 127–28; pain/pleasure calculus of, 4, 24, 27, 65, 67–68, 78, 126–27; and the philosophical radicals, 16–17; and self-interest, 9, 68–69; and sensationalism, 4, 126–28; and Percy Shelley, 16; and somaeconomics, 4, 124, 127; A Table of the Springs of Action, 65; and utilitarianism, 16, 65, 67–68
bioeconomics, 3, 4, 35–61, 46, 48, 60, 86– 117, 88, 89, 93–94, 97, 185; and anthropology, 190; and biology, 190; and Edwin Chadwick, 111, 185; and Charles Dickens, 4, 5, 35; and George Eliot, 4–5, 35, 157; and eudemonism, 185; and life and death, 3, 4, 35; and T. R. Malthus, 4, 46, 48, 60, 97, 190; and J. R. McCulloch, 185; and Our Mutual Friend, 86–117, 93, 94, 97, 108, 131; and psychophysiology, 111, 185; and David Ricardo, 97, 189; and John Ruskin, 89; and the sanitarians, 105, 109; and Nassau Senior, 185; and Scenes of Clerical Life, 157, 173; and sensation, 185; versus somaeconomics, 35–61, 183, 185; and Herbert Spencer, 185, 189; and Unto This Last, 89
birth control, 10, 12
Black, R. D. Collison, 123n9

-195-

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