Undercover: How I Went from Company Man to FBI Spy--And Exposed the Worst Healthcare Fraud in U.S. History

By John W. Schilling | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Most of all, I want to thank my family for their unwavering support. I am extremely grateful to my lovely wife, Kirsten, for her support and assistance. She was instrumental in all aspects of this book including the development of ideas and review of my work. To my children, Alex, Abby, and Austin, I greatly appreciated your patience while I was writing my story.

I want especially to thank my mother and father. At an early age, you taught me to respect others, be honest, and strive to live with integrity. You instilled the values I possess today.

The efforts of many people went into making this book a reality. I am grateful for their contributions. Stan Wakefield, thank you for believing in this project from its inception and for your encouragement throughout the process. Mark Taylor, your tireless hours of work, thoughtful contributions, and encouragement are greatly appreciated. A special thanks to my friends Jim Alderson and Connie Alderson for all your contributions, support, and comments. Tom Jahnke, thank you for all your creative ideas. Last, I am grateful to my friends and attorneys who worked diligently on my case: John Phillips, Peter Chatfield, Stephen Meagher, Gerry Stern, Chris Hoyer, Judy Hoyer, Chris Casper, Al Scudieri. Without you and your support, this book would have never come to fruition.

Many other people made considerable contributions to this book. Thank you Stuart Rennert, Kevin McDonough, Marcia Taylor, Gillian Klucas, Darlene House, Carolyn Washburne, and Jim Moorman, Jeb White, and Patrick Burns (Taxpayers Against Fraud).

-xi-

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