Undercover: How I Went from Company Man to FBI Spy--And Exposed the Worst Healthcare Fraud in U.S. History

By John W. Schilling | Go to book overview

Epilogue

Looking back, I am still astounded to have played a role in the history of this era and these landmark settlements. While I invested seven years of my life in these cases, I am not the only one who dedicated such time. I am extremely grateful to the talented attorneys at Phillips & Cohen for their diligence and unwavering support, and I'm thankful to the Justice Department for seeing beyond the fog of Medicare cost reporting. I am also proud to have played a role in returning $1.7 billion to Medicare. I would do it all again. The effect of those investigations cannot be measured solely by the settlement amounts. The lawsuits reverberated within the healthcare industry years after they were filed and became publicly known, spurring greater compliance with Medicare rules and healthcare laws and exerting a huge deterrent effect on healthcare providers.

The bias against whistleblowers is deeply engrained in U.S. culture. To many, the term whistleblower evokes negative images characterized by disparagements like rats or moles. I've been called “tattletale,” “snitch,” “disgruntled,” and worse. Some people, however, believe whistleblowers serve an important role in our society: to report wrongdoing and corruption that would otherwise go undetected and unpunished. By standing up for what I believe in, I sacrificed a successful accounting career and was ostracized by the healthcare industry, but it didn't ruin my life. While I'm not a highly recruited commodity in the healthcare business world, I remain gainfully employed. Several years ago, I founded JWS Group, a forensic healthcare financial consulting business. I offer healthcare fraud

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