Qualitative Methods in Sports Studies

By David L. Andrews; Daniel S. Mason et al. | Go to book overview

5 Interviewing for Case Study
Research

John Amis

I like data. I like the process of exploration, of discovery, of uncovering some of what is happening in the world around us, and trying to understand why it is happening. Furthermore, I believe that the underlying basis of any such understanding depends on gaining an appreciation of how individuals construct their social world, and interact with it. In this sense, I side with Altheide and Johnson (1994) and their supposition that the social world cannot be taken as a literal world but should instead be viewed as one that is individually constructed and interpreted. In other words, we make sense of the world around us based on our individual values and experiences, and thus we all interpret events in our lives, even shared events, differently. It is this interpretation that constitutes the basis and source of social reality (Burrell & Morgan, 1979), and thus frames our understanding of the social world within which we exist.

Researching within an interpretivist paradigm might perhaps predispose analysis of the social world to taking a qualitative form. Indeed C. Wright Mills (1959) has highlighted the danger of reducing our study of the social world to statistical aggregations, arguing that such a course of action brings with it an inherent danger that the accompanying results may fail to fit “reality.” The debate as to whether qualitative and quantitative approaches represent different epistemological stances or are merely different tools for data collection that can be used interchangeably has been ongoing throughout the social sciences (see, for example, Bryman, 1988). Within the interpretive paradigm, qualitative approaches have been dominant and have generally drawn on interviewing as a major method of data collection. That said, quantitative methods can, of course, be very useful and I have used them in my own work. Care is needed, however, to ensure that data are appropriately contextualized and interpreted, something that is often lacking in quantitative research. Bauer, Gaskell and Allum's (2000: 8) mantra of “no quantification without qualification, no statistical analysis without interpretation” exemplifies this point. Interviews that are used to collect quantitative data will likely be much more structured than those that are qualitatively oriented, an issue to which I return below. While both have utility given the focus of this book, my concentration in this chapter will be on using interviews to collect qualitative data.

-104-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Qualitative Methods in Sports Studies
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 210

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.