The Politics of Women's Rights: Parties, Positions, and Change

By Christina Wolbrecht | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIVE
Equilibrium Disruption and Issue Redefinition

CHAPTERS 2 and 3 detailed the evolution of the parties' relative positions on women's rights from the early 1950s to the early 1990s. While there is some variation in the behavior of each party in their various elite-level incarnations—organizations, presidents, House and Senate delegations— the predominant pattern is remarkably consistent. In the 1950s and early 1960s, few elites or citizens recognized women's rights as a legitimate public policy issue, but on the small agenda with which activists and interested elites were concerned, Republicans were slightly more supportive of women's rights compared to their Democratic counterparts. Differences between the parties narrowed across the 1960s. Beginning in the late 1960s and early 1970s, women's rights emerged as a major political issue. Both parties' platforms devoted unprecedented levels of attention to women's rights, and conventions were characterized by extensive debate and controversy over the issue. While the platforms were not greatly differentiated in the early 1970s, differences grew across the decade, culminating in significant divergence at decade's end. After 1980, polarization between the two parties on women's rights, with Democrats relatively more supportive, was the norm. In Congress, the House experienced a dramatic reversal during the 92nd Congress (1971–1972) as Democrats became more supportive of women's rights than Republicans, with polarization generally increasing thereafter. In the Senate, the change was more gradual; beginning with the 92nd Congress, Democrats were more likely to cosponsor pro–women's rights legislation, but differences were not statistically significant until the late-1980s.

This and the following chapter evaluate the empirical evidence in support of the explanation for the evolution of the parties' relative positions outlined in chapter 4. This theoretically grounded explanation identifies those circumstances expected to contribute to a shift in one or both of the parties' positions and in what direction we might expect that shift to occur. Furthermore, the explanation is cross-institutional in that it seeks to explain the relative positions taken by the parties in their various elite forms: organizations, executives, and Congressional delegations. As a result, the analysis calls for a wide-ranging sweep of available evidence.

The model I developed in chapter 4 focused on three variables—the issue, party coalitions, and party elites—and the process of issue equilib

-134-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Politics of Women's Rights: Parties, Positions, and Change
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 266

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.