Little Rock: Race and Resistance at Central High School

By Karen Anderson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE
Mapping Change: Little Rock
Forges a Desegregation Plan

With the confident air of a high pressure salesman Dr. Blos-
som produced charts, maps and statistics describing where
Negro and white high school pupils lived. He explained
that … attendance areas could be developed which would
result in maximum avoidance of the mixing of the races.

—Rev. Colbert Cartwright1

In 1953, the Little Rock School Board hired Virgil Blossom, then director of schools in Fayetteville, as its new superintendent, a decision that would profoundly shape the future direction of school politics in Little Rock. A former football player, the tall and burly Blossom was physically imposing. Willful, visionary, and ambitious, the school administrator could project a daunting political presence. A former student at Fayetteville High School, who had been sent to Blossom's office after one too many infractions, reported this encounter with his school's principal: “Mr. Blossom just talked to me, but as he talked I started getting smaller and he started getting bigger. By the time he got through, he was the biggest man I ever saw.” Regarding Blossom's “conference methods,” another observer noted that he had “played tackle on the football team of the University and he still relies on power plays.”2

Blossom used such strategies of domination in policy discussions as well. Arkansas Council for Human Relations executive director Nathan Griswold reported that school patrons often reported difficulty in “getting through” to Blossom and that the superintendent “seemed quite uneasy in any meeting where he was not in charge.” When Blossom spoke before community groups about Little Rock's school desegregation plan, for ex

-19-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Little Rock: Race and Resistance at Central High School
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 332

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.