Privacy in Context: Technology, Policy, and the Integrity of Social Life

By Helen Nissenbaum | Go to book overview
Save to active project

PART II
CRITICAL SURVEY OF
PREDOMINANT APPROACHES
TO PRIVACY

THE INCREASINGLY PREVALENT SYSTEMS FOR WATCHING over people, the massive storage and analytic capabilities of information systems, and the astonishing powers of dissemination of digital media discussed in Part I are not all controversial. But inevitably, with persisting regularity, certain systems invoke storms of protest and perplexed disquiet as reflected in popular opinion surveys and vocal, sometimes coordinated advocacy by nongovernmental organizations. As often as not, proponents of these systems are the industry representatives and governmental agencies who have implemented them. Popular media have created a record of these antagonistic exchanges, which reveal mutual suspicion, indignation, worried resignation, and something between grudging and trusting acceptance by those who are the subjects of monitoring, profiling, and disclosure.

A number of questions are worth asking. Why do we care? Why do we resist some systems and embrace others? What makes them troubling and controversial? What ought we, as individuals and societies, do about them—leave them be, regulate, or prohibit? And, how do we go about formulating legitimate answers to these questions?

Some believe that people's preferences and interests ought to serve as touchstones for a solution. When controversy arises over a system, it should be possible to map out distinct stakeholder groups and demonstrate how their respective interests a re promoted or suppressed. To be sure, such an approach to resolving controversial matters—maximizing

-65-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Privacy in Context: Technology, Policy, and the Integrity of Social Life
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 288

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?