ILLUSTRATIONS
1. facing page
2. 1 Shakespeare's birthplace in mid-Victorian times (Photo: Radio Times Hulton Picture Library) 56
3. 2 Rustic festivities, c. 1569. Painting by J. Hoefnagel. In the collection of Lord Salisbury (Photo: Courtauld Institute of Art ) 56
4. 3 Queen Elizabeth in procession. In the collection of Simon Wingfield Digby MP (Photo: Royal Academy) 56
5. 4 The wedding masque, and other scenes in his career, of Sir Henry Unton. Painting by unknown artist. (Photo: National Portrait Gallery ) 56
6. 5 Miniature of Queen Elizabeth I in old age by Isaac Oliver (Photo: Victoria and Albert Museum) 56
7. 6 English costumes about 1580. From Caspar Rutz, Habitus Variorum Orbus Gentum, 1581, in the British Museum (Photo: John Freeman) 57
8. 7 Elizabethan chivalry: George Clifford, Earl of Cumberland. Painting by Nicholas Hilliard (Photo: National Maritime Greenwich Museum ) 57
9. 8 An Elizabethan Court beauty: Mary Fitton. Portrait by an unknown artist. In the collection of Mrs C. G. Lancaster104
10. 9 An Elizabethan great house: Hardwick Hall, Derbyshire (Photo: A. F. Kersting) 104
11. 10 Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex. Portrait by an unknown artist (Photo: National Portrait Gallery) 104
12. 11 William Cecil, 1st Lord Burghley. Portrait by an unknown artist (Photo: Bodleian Oxford Library) 105

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Shakespeare: A Biography
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 354

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.