We Are Not What We Seem: Black Nationalism and Class Struggle in the American Century

By Rod Bush | Go to book overview

Index
Abernathy, Ralph, 162
Abu-Jamal, Mumia, 220
Acoli, Sundiota, 219–220
Addams, Jane, 77
African American Leadership Summit, 1
African American national question, 7,
238
African Blood Brotherhood, 63, 84, 237, 241, 242
on Black leadership, 107–108
challenge Garvey, 97
and CPUSA, 109
decline of, 110
evolution of, 102–112
and Irish Republican Brotherhood and Sinn Fein, 107
role of veterans in, 110
statement of views, 108
and Tulsa Riot, 107
and UNIA, 108–109
African Liberation Support Committee, 42,192,193,211,212
African Masonic Lodge, 146
African National Congress, 198
African Nationalist Pioneer Movement, 184
African Patriotic League, 149, 151
African Peoples Party, 212
African Peoples Socialist Party, 7, 8, 42, 192, 193,213,245n.l0,248249n. 10
and 1996 St. Petersburg rebellion, 239
on war on drugs, 44
Afro-American Association, 194
Afro-American Council, 74
Afro-American Liberty League, 91
Afrocentricity, 37, 50
Afro-Christianity, 145, 182
Ahmed, Muhammed, 212
Akpan, Kwadjo, 212
All, John, 174, 178, 180
Ali, Noble Drew (Timothy Drew), 142
Alkalimat, Abdul, 140, 212, 225, 239
Allen, Ernest, 120, 206, 207
Ameer, Leon, 178
Amenia Conference, 80
American Dilemma, An (Myrdal), 153
American Jewish Committee, 53
American Negro Labor Congress, 114
American Pro-Falasha Committee, 149
Amin, Samir, 86–87
Baker, Ella, 160, 162
Baker, General, 206, 208
Bandung (spirit of), 26, 186, 230
Baraka, Amin, 210–211, 212, 223
Barry, Marion, 160
Basheer, Ahmed, 186
Belafonte, Harry, 166
Bell, Herman, 219
Ben Bella, Ahmed, 177
benign neglect, 4
Berry, Abner, 137, 149
Beveridge, Albert, 70
Bingham, Stephen, 217, 218
bin Wahaad, Dhoruba, 219
Birmingham rebellion (1963), 176
Black Acupuncture Advisory Association of North America, 220
Black capitalism, 4, 224
Black Freedom Agenda, 239
Black-Jewish alliance, 79
Black-Jewish tensions, 32–33, 38–40
Black Liberation Army, 219–220, 221 its Multinational Task Force, 220
Black Manifesto, 208
Black Men's Committee Against Crack, 7, 54

-305-

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