Judging Evil: Rethinking the Law of Murder and Manslaughter

By Samuel H. Pillsbury | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Many people assisted with the research and writing of this book. I want to thank my research assistants present and past: Suzy Snyder, Karen Cox, Paige Ross, Ruth Pinkel, Hannah Irsfeld, Lisa Farrington, and Joseph Carlucci; the students of the three Criminal Law Seminar classes who read and commented on the book in draft form; and the staff, past and present, of the Loyola Law Library, in particular Bob Nissenbaum, Bill Mulherin, and Demetrio Orlino. My school, Loyola Law School, has provided generous research support through the Burns Foundation. I also must thank David Duffee and the School of Criminal Justice at the State University of New York, Albany, where I spent a sabbatical in the fall of 1992. Those who have read the manuscript or predecessor works and helped with comments include Peter Arenella, Anne Coughlin, Rebecca Dresser, R. A. Duff, Josh Dressier, Martin Gardner, Laurie Levenson, Tom Morawetz, Jeffrie Murphy, Rick Singer, Larry Solum, and George Thomas. Help here should certainly not be confused with agreement, however. Ideas contained in the book were sharpened by presentations to the law faculties of Rutgers-Newark, the University of Southern California, and Loyola. My special thanks to my colleague Lary Lawrence, who has always believed in this book and in my scholarly efforts; and to my wife, Linda, who has never allowed my work to become too academic, in the pejorative sense.

Portions of this book have been drawn from the following previously published articles by the author: Crimes of Indifference, 49 Rutgers Law Review 105 (1996); The Meaning of Deserved Punishment, 67 Indiana Law Journal 719 (1992); Evil and the Law of Murder, 24 U.C. Davis Law Review 437 (1990); and Emotional Justice: Moralizing the Passions of Criminal Punishment, 74 Cornell Law Review 655 (1989). Permission by the respective law reviews for the use of this material is gratefully acknowledged.

-xiii-

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