Judging Evil: Rethinking the Law of Murder and Manslaughter

By Samuel H. Pillsbury | Go to book overview

7
The Worst Crime of All

On the night of January 15, 1978, Ted Bundy went hunting. He had done it
many times before. He was good at it. He wore several layers of clothes so he
could change quickly. He carried at least three pairs of knotted pantyhose that
he could use as a mask or a ligature. And he had a club that he had fashioned
from a tree branch wrapped with cloth. This made a deadly weapon which
could not be traced to him as a gun might be.

Bundy had arrived in Tallahassee, Florida, a few weeks earlier, after having
escaped from jail in Colorado, where he faced a murder charge. He found
lodgings in a rooming house near the campus of Florida State University. He
liked college campuses. He had a college degree and had attended law school
for a while. But mostly he liked college campuses because he liked to hunt
women students.

That night he hung out at a bar frequented by Florida State students. Later
in the evening he apparently tried to attack a young woman nearby, but she
ran from him and escaped. Later Bundy went to a campus sorority house, that
of Chi Omega. It was early in the morning when he entered the sorority
through a door with a bad lock. Once inside, he went wild. He entered the
room of Lisa Levy. As he had done many times before, he smashed the woman
in the head with a blunt object, this time his club.The crushing blow laid open
her skull. He raped her and sodomized her with an aerosol can. He bit her but-
tocks, leaving a deep mark in her flesh.

Bundy then went across the hall and attacked Karen Chandler. His blows
broke Chandler's jaw, fractured her skull, the bones surrounding one eye, both
her cheekbones, and opened deep cuts in her face. He also attacked Chandler's
roommate, Kathy Kleiner, again smashing her in the face. Her jaw was broken
and some of her teeth were knocked out. Blood from the two women spat-
tered everywhere, even on the ceiling. Bundy moved on.

In another room he found Margaret Bowman, who he clubbed and stran-
gled to death. Then he heard the sound of someone coming into the sorority
and he fled. On his way back to his rooming house, Bundy stopped to break
into the apartment of Cheryl Thomas, a twenty-one-year-old dance student.
While she slept he smashed her jaw. Police later discovered a pantyhose mask
and a large semen stain on Thomas's bloody bed.

-98-

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Judging Evil: Rethinking the Law of Murder and Manslaughter
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Judging Evil - Rethinking the Law of Murder and Manslaughter iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface the Challenge of Criminal Responsibility vii
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Part I - Deserved Punishment 1
  • 1: A Question of Value 3
  • 2: The Value of Choice 18
  • 3: Punishment as Defense of Value 32
  • 4: Just Punishment in an Unjust Society 47
  • 5: Moralizing the Passions of Punishment 62
  • Part II - Defining Murder and Manslaughter 77
  • 6: From Principles to Rules - An Introduction to Mens Rea 79
  • 7: The Worst Crime of All 98
  • 8: Crimes of Passion 125
  • 9: Crimes of Indifference 161
  • Appendix - Proposed Jury Instructions 189
  • Notes 197
  • Index 261
  • About the Author 264
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