Hart Crane: After His Lights

By Brian M. Reed | Go to book overview

6
Paul Blackburn's Crane

Nebulous declarations of “influence” have long been a regular feature of the canon formation game, a means of sorting writers into camps, clans, and traditions. For many critics—Harold Bloom most notably—authorial influence is analogous to parental authority. As chapter 1 indicates, Bloom and his followers believe that the literary field is generationally divided and oedipally organized. A writer's greatness is measured by his or her ability to reinvent “transumptively” the poetry of a chosen precursor. This logic reduces literary history to a connect-the-dots parent-child family tree: Bloom's favorite run is Wordsworth-Emerson-Whitman-Stevens-Ashbery. In turn, these descent lines define the scope and character of literary scholarship. One need study only these heroic individuals and their intergenerational conflict in order to contribute to the larger field.

This reductive deployment of “influence” depends on an impoverished sense of how and why poets write. Poets rarely if ever limit themselves to extended, insistent imitatio of a single precursor. In the course of learning their art, apprentice poets tend to read widely and deeply. They are also likely to explore their interests forward and backward in time. Why not read Jonson, Marlowe, Webster, and Donne—as Crane did—in addition to or in place of work by one's immediate poetic elders? Why not, too, prize the work of one's contemporaries—as Crane did Allen Tate's, Laura Riding's, Gertrude Stein's, and James Joyce's? “Influence” is not a slow stream with easy stages. It more closely resembles the U.S. telephone system: a web of ephemeral far-flung connections that take place via legacy equipment, new hardware, multiple operating systems, and improvised software patches.

Poststructuralism did literary history a great service by replacing “influence” with “intertextuality” as a foundational concept.1 Intertextuality as the

-169-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Hart Crane: After His Lights
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • A Note on Citation ix
  • Introduction - Hart Crane Again 1
  • Part One - Reading Crane 15
  • 1: How American 17
  • 2: How Queer 39
  • 3: How Modern 71
  • Part Two - Crane Writing 95
  • 4: How to Write a Lyric 97
  • 5: How to Write an Epic 126
  • Part Three - Reading Crane 167
  • 6: Paul Blackburn's Crane 169
  • 7: Frank O'Hara's Crane 195
  • 8: Bob Kaufman's Crane 225
  • Notes 247
  • Works Cited 271
  • Index 287
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 295

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.