The Affect Effect: Dynamics of Emotion in Political Thinking and Behavior

By W. Russell Neuman; George E. Marcus et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FOURTEEN
Politics and the Equilibrium of Fear:
Can Strategies and Emotions Interact?

ARTHUR LUPIA AND JESSE O. MENNINC

Political scientists seek improved explanations of political behaviors and outcomes. Improvement comes not only from the promulgation of new concepts for thinking about politics but also from refined understandings of the conditions under which more established concepts apply. Political psychologists engage in such explorations. So do game theorists. We argue that these two groups have something to offer one another, something that can improve explanations of some of the social behaviors on which these groups focus. To set the stage for this offering, we begin with a brief description of what each group of scholars does.

Political psychologists use research concerning human thought and perception from other disciplines to inform and motivate their work. In this field there are no widely accepted guidelines for what it means to engage in the practice. Some political psychologists follow standard social psychological practices, designing research from a laboratory-based stimulusresponse paradigm and running experiments whose relation to specific scientific questions is simple and clear. Others follow practices that are common to the study of public opinion and voting behavior. They draw inferences from regressions conducted on answers to multipurpose questions placed on large surveys. Still, political psychologists embed experiments in surveys. So instead of being defined by use of a single method, political psychology is defined by the use of an expanding range of methods.

Game theorists seek precise explanations of the causes of individual behaviors and collective outcomes. They use mathematized premises and conclusions to draw logically coherent inferences about when and why

We thank Adam Seth Levine for research and the volume editors, Ted Brader, and
Elizabeth Suhay for helpful advice.

-337-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Affect Effect: Dynamics of Emotion in Political Thinking and Behavior
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 453

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.