The 100 Most Popular Young Adult Authors: Biographical Sketches and Bibliographies

By Bernard A. Drew | Go to book overview

Jay Bennett

Suspense

New York City
December 24,1912

The Hooded Man

I went into the field [of writing young adult fiction] to try to reach the young with all the skill and thought I had learned in a lifetime of writing in many genres,” Jay Bennett said in Literature for Today's Young Adults. “I felt that the young were alive, questioning, and in the main were far more decent human beings than were their elders.”

“Readers suffer and triumph with Bennett's lonely heroes who pit themselves against organized crime, deadly racists, and— especially—sinister adults who seem harmless on the surface,” Anne Janette Johnson said.

Bennett's fictional victims “have real blood, not catchup, and the screams aren't caused by the rocking chair coming down on the cat's tail,” George A. Woods stated.

The son of a Jewish immigrant businessman, Bennett held a variety of jobs as an adult: on a farm, in a factory, and at a beach. He also was a mailman, a salesman, and an editor for an encyclopedia. During World War II, from 1942 to 1945, he wrote for the Office of War Information.

Besides writing fiction for young adults and adults, he has crafted two plays and several radio scripts, including Miracle Before Christmas and The Wind and Stars Are Witness. He has written television scripts for Alfred Hitchcock Presents; Crime Syndicated; Wide, Wide World; Cameo Theater; and Monodrama Theatre. Bennett, who looks to William Shakespeare as an influence, was the first to adapt Hamlet for television, winning an award from the Shakespeare Society for this.

-35-

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The 100 Most Popular Young Adult Authors: Biographical Sketches and Bibliographies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction xxvii
  • Joan Aiken 1
  • Louisa May Alcott 8
  • Lloyd Alexander 12
  • V. C. Andrews 17
  • Piers Anthony 22
  • Avi 30
  • Jay Bennett 35
  • Cynthia Blair 39
  • Francesca Lia Block 42
  • Judy Blume 45
  • Sue Ellen Bridgers 50
  • Bruce Brooks 53
  • Betsy Byars 56
  • Alice Childress 61
  • James L. Collier Christopher Collier 65
  • Caroline B. Cooney 69
  • Susan Cooper 73
  • Robert Cormier 77
  • Chris Crutcher 83
  • Richie Tankersley Cusick 86
  • Paula Danziger 89
  • Peter Dickinson 93
  • Franklin W. Dixon 98
  • Lois Duncan 109
  • Paula Fox 115
  • Jean Craighead George 120
  • Eileen Goudge 124
  • Bette Greene 128
  • Rosa Guy 131
  • Lynn Hall 135
  • Virginia Hamilton 139
  • Jamake Highwater 143
  • S. E. Hinton 147
  • Isabelle Holland 151
  • H. M. Hoover 156
  • Monica Hughes 159
  • Hadley Irwin 163
  • Brian Jacques 167
  • Diana Wynne Jones 170
  • Carolyn Keene 174
  • M. E. Kerr 191
  • Stephen King 197
  • Norma Klein 205
  • Rouald Koertge 211
  • E. L. Konigsburg 214
  • Gordon Korman 217
  • Madeleine L'Engle 220
  • C. S. Lewis 225
  • Robert Lipsyte 230
  • Jack London 234
  • Lois Lowry 240
  • Margaret Mahy 244
  • Ann M. Martin 249
  • Harry Mazer 257
  • Norma Fox Mazer 261
  • Anne Mccaffrey 266
  • Lurlene Mcdaniel 273
  • Robin Mckinley 277
  • Nicholasa Mohr 281
  • Lucy Maud Montgomery 284
  • Walter Dean Myers 289
  • Phyllis Reynolds Naylor 295
  • Joan Lowery Nixon 301
  • Andre Norton 308
  • Scott O'Dell 316
  • Janette Oke 320
  • Francine Pascal 324
  • Katherine Paterson 337
  • Gary Paulsen 341
  • Richard Peck 347
  • Robert Nowton Pack 352
  • Susan Beth Pfeffer 356
  • Christopher Pike 360
  • Janet Quin-Harkin 365
  • Ann Rinaldi 369
  • Cynthia Rylant 372
  • Marilyn Sachs 375
  • J. D. Salinger 378
  • Ouida Sebestyen 382
  • William Sleator 385
  • Gary Soto 388
  • Jerry Spinelli 391
  • R. L. Stine 394
  • Todd Strasser 402
  • Mildred D. Taylor 406
  • Theodore Taylor 409
  • Joyce Carol Thomas 413
  • Julian F. Thompson 416
  • J. R. R. Tolkien 419
  • Mark Twain 423
  • Cynthia Voigt 429
  • Jill Paton Walsh 433
  • Barbara Wersba 436
  • Robert Westall 439
  • Phyllis A. Whitney 443
  • Patricia C. Wrede 448
  • Patricia Wrightson 451
  • Laurence Yep 454
  • Jane Yolen 459
  • Paul Zindel 465
  • Author/Title/Series Index 471
  • Genre Index 527
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