The Innocence Commission: Preventing Wrongful Convictions and Restoring the Criminal Justice System

By Jon B. Gould | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

To say that this book owes to a team of collaborators hardly does justice to the process that spawned its subject. Without the Innocence Commission for Virginia (ICVA), there would have been no book, and without a dedicated steering committee, advisory board, and strong team of pro bono lawyers, the ICVA would not have succeeded. My thanks goes, first, to the cofounders of the ICVA: Don Salzman, Ginny Sloan, Julia Sullivan, and Misty Thomas. I cannot say enough good things about the four. Not only are they incredibly talented and dedicated, but they are delightful to work with as well. Each is especially patient and good-humored, having put up with me as chair of the ICVA. Misty's replacement, Shawn Armbrust, has been a terrific addition, bringing energy, clear thinking, and a wonderfully wry sense of humor that helps brighten what otherwise might be a somber subject.

The ICVA's advisory board members—Joan Anderson, Steve Benjamin, Rodney Leffler, William Sessions, Frank Stokes, John Tucker, and John Whitehead—provided invaluable guidance, direction, and support as the ICVA pursued the investigations and published the report. They deserve special thanks for agreeing to associate with a fledging organization at a time when all we could show them was a blueprint for action. I only hope that the ICVA's work, some of it described here, justifies their support.

Most important, the ICVA's work could not have been done without the tremendous contribution of attorneys from eleven terrific law firms, who helped conduct the case investigations, completed legal research projects, and prepared recommendations for the ICVA's report. Some of these lawyers have since switched positions, but the firms deserve great credit for putting their money where their mouths are in supporting pro bono work. They make law a respectable profession and give lawyers a deservedly good name. Thanks go to the following law firms:

-ix-

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