Facilitating Project Performance Improvement: A Practical Guide to Multi-Level Learning

By Jerry Julian | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

Project work in many organizations today is “the new normal.” An up side to project work is the opportunity for rich learning. Project teams form a temporary community with a common focus even though members may be spread around the world and often cross professional, functional, and cultural boundaries. Project teams bring people together with diverse backgrounds to achieve shared aims on common tasks under tight timelines—often in collaboration with customers and other stakeholders —in ways that require innovation and knowledge sharing.

However, the conditions under which project teams work are challenging and turbulent, and organizations are not always prepared to change the way they work when they become “projectized.” Learning in project teams often requires coordination, alignment, and intentionality. Team members learn by experimenting and using results to adjust their plans and processes as they work.

But many project teams are not able to learn quickly in ways that not only help them complete projects on time and under budget but that also build knowledge, skills, and improvements for team members, project groups, and the larger organization. And even when project teams do learn, these insights, approaches, and competencies are not mined by the organization to benefit work of other project teams.

Jerry Julian describes these difficult learning conditions as “red light learning” and proceeds to show how an organization can instead engage “green light learning.” This book will help readers who want to accelerate project team learning and find ways to leverage that learning across boundaries within the organization. Julian introduces a multi-level learning

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