Facilitating Project Performance Improvement: A Practical Guide to Multi-Level Learning

By Jerry Julian | Go to book overview

3

THE MULTI-LEVEL
LEARNING COACH

Organizations will require help in moving from traditional project and program management to an adaptive, continuous systems-l evel learning approach. The multi-l evel learning coach helps organizations make this journey by providing objective, substantively neutral facilitation and coaching that helps teams learn from experience, adapt to changing conditions, and continuously improve their performance. You may be interested in stepping into this role yourself, or you may want to find someone who can play this role for you or for your client's organization. Either way, this chapter begins with an overview of the role of the multi-level learning coach, then moves to a discussion of the importance of neutrality and objectivity, the skills required of those serving in this role, the core values of group facilitation, the basics of effective group process, and guidance on how the multi-level learning coach can intervene to help groups reflect, learn, and improve.


OVERVIEW OF THE MULTI-LEVEL LEARNING COACH ROLE

As an experienced hand, the multi-level learning coach works to build the organization's ongoing capability for continuous improvement at three levels: project, process, and strategy. She works with program managers, project managers, project management office (PMO) personnel, and senior leaders to devise practical ways to integrate action-reflection cycles into the organization's ongoing work routines. The multi-level learning coach often begins her work by introducing the senior management team

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