Dead Hands: A Social History of Wills, Trusts, and Inheritance Law

By Lawrence M. Friedman | Go to book overview

NOTES

CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION

1. See Liesl Schillinger, “Astors Place,” New York Times, August 13, 2007, Sunday Book Review.

2. “Banta: His Character Still Under Official Investigation,” Los Angeles Times, June 20, 1889, p. 3.

3. “The Banta Case Still: A Witness Who Saw the Old Man Stark Crazy,” Los Angeles Times, June 26, 1889, p. 2.

4. “The Will Sustained: Son-in Law Pierce Will Administer the Estate,” Los Angeles Times, July 11, 1889, p. 2.

5. Los Angeles Times, August 29, 1889, p. 6.

6. This information is from the website of the Cryonics Institute, http://www.cryonics. org/become2.html, visited September 18, 2007.

7. John J. Havens and Paul G. Schervish, “Millionaires and the Millennium: New Estimates of the Forthcoming Wealth Transfer and the Prospects for a Golden Age of Philanthropy,” Boston College Social Welfare Research Institute, Report, released October 19, 1999; John J. Havens and Paul G. Schervish, “Why the $41 Trillion Wealth Transfer Estimate Is Still Valid: A Review of Challenges and Questions,” Journal of Gift Planning 7: 11 (2003).

8. George E. Marcus with Peter Dobkin Hall, Lives in Trust: The Fortunes of Dynastic Families in Late Twentieth-Century America (1993).

9. On this “regression to the mean,” see Jenny B. Wahl, “From Riches to Riches: Inter

-185-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dead Hands: A Social History of Wills, Trusts, and Inheritance Law
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - Distribution After Death 15
  • Chapter 3 - The Last Will and Testament 58
  • Chapter 4 - Breaking a Will 82
  • Chapter 5 - Will Substitutes 100
  • Chapter 6 - Dynastic and Caretaker Trusts 111
  • Chapter 7 - Control by the Dead and Its Limits 125
  • Chapter 8 - Charitable Gifts and Foundations 140
  • Chapter 9 - Death and Taxes 171
  • Chapter 10 - Conclusions 179
  • Notes 185
  • Index 217
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 231

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.