American Cinema of the 1970s: Themes and Variations

By Lester D. Friedman | Go to book overview

1978
Movies and Changing Times

CHARLES J. MALAND

In 1964 folksinger Bob Dylan prophetically sang that “the times they are a-changin.'” He could have brought the song back fourteen years later, for both American culture and the American film industry were changing again in various ways that were not always easy to discern. The movies—our dynamic medium of cultural mythmaking—were focusing on some of those changes in the most interesting releases of the year. American culture was moving away from the leftist political spirit that Dylan had earlier helped usher in and toward an emerging political conservatism. The tension was evident in the debate over abortion, seen in a Newsweek cover story called “Abortion Under Attack” (5 June). Government spending, high taxes, and a growing inflation rate all were targeted by the political right, culminating in early June with the passage of Proposition 13 in California: 65 percent of the voters cast ballots to immediately cut property taxes and place restrictions on how much the state legislature could increase them in subsequent years. A week later one commentator called tax revolt “the new gut issue in American politics” (Boeth 20). In foreign affairs President Jimmy Carter brokered discussions between Egyptian president Anwar Sadat and Israeli prime minister Menachem Begin, leading late in the year to the Camp David Accords, a framework for peace signed by Egypt and Israel that many hoped would bring stability to that troubled part of the world.

In cultural life, the highest-rated television shows included “Laverne and Shirley,” “Three's Company,” “Mork and Mindy,” and “Happy Days.” Pulitzer Prizes went to The Stories of John Cheever for fiction, Robert Penn Warren's Now and Then for poetry, and Edward O. Wilson's overview of sociobiology, On Human Nature, for nonfiction. James Michener's Chesapeake was one of the top-selling novels; best-selling nonfiction included Erma Bombeck's If Life Is a Bowl of Cherries—What Am I Doing in the Pits, Christina Crawford's Mommie Dearest (about the author's movie-star mother, Joan), and James Fixx's The Complete Book of Running. The latter revealed the growing popularity of jogging, and of exercise in general among adult Americans during the year. In sports, the Yankees beat the Red Sox 5–4 on Bucky

-205-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Cinema of the 1970s: Themes and Variations
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 285

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.