American Cinema of the 1970s: Themes and Variations

By Lester D. Friedman | Go to book overview

1970–1979
Select Academy Awards

1970

Best Picture: Patton, Twentieth Century Fox

Best Actor: George C. Scott in Patton, Twentieth Century Fox

Best Actress: Glenda Jackson in Women in Love, United Artists

Best Supporting Actor: John Mills in Ryan's Daughter, MGM

Best Supporting Actress: Helen Hayes in Airport, Universal

Best Director: Franklin J. Schaffner, Patton, Twentieth Century Fox

Best Adapted Screenplay: Ring Lardner Jr., M*A*S*H, Twentieth Century Fox

Best Original Story and Screenplay: Francis Ford Coppola and Edmund H. North, Patton, Twentieth Century Fox

Best Cinematography: Freddie Young, Ryan's Daughter, MGM

Best Film Editing: Hugh S. Fowler, Patton, Twentieth Century Fox

Best Original Score: Francis Lai, Love Story, Paramount

Best Original Song Score: The Beatles, Let It Be, United Artists


1971

Best Picture: The French Connection, Twentieth Century Fox

Best Actor: Gene Hackman in The French Connection, Twentieth Century Fox

Best Actress: Jane Fonda in Klute, Warner Bros.

Best Supporting Actor: Ben Johnson in The Last Picture Show, Columbia

Best Supporting Actress: Cloris Leachman in The Last Picture Show, Columbia

Best Director: William Friedkin, The French Connection, Twentieth Century Fox

Best Adapted Screenplay: Ernest Tidyman, The French Connection, Twentieth Century Fox

Best Original Story and Screenplay: Paddy Chayefsky, The Hospital, United Artists

Best Cinematography: Oswald Morris, Fiddler on the Roof, Mirisch-Cartier Production

Best Film Editing: Gerald B. Greenberg, The French Connection, Twentieth Century Fox

Best Original Score: Michel Legrand, Summer of '42, Warner Bros.

Best Adaptation Score: John Williams, Fiddler on the Roof, Mirisch-Cartier Production

-251-

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