Feminism and Renaissance Studies

By Lorna Hutson | Go to book overview

14 La Donnesca Mano

Fredrika Jacobs

In the congenial arts I see us still obliged to renounce sculpture
and even painting … The “decency” that excludes us from study-
ing the human form, everything in our ethos opposes our
progress … Thus we are limited to music, dance and banal
versifying. Meager resources, which lead nowhere.

(Mme Louise d'Epinay, 1771)

Is an image reflective of its maker and does it reveal something about the individual who produced it? Leonard da Vinci's well-known aphorism, “Every artist paints himself [ogni dipintore dipinge se]” suggests it does. In fact, examples of the reflexivity of art are not hard to find in early critical writings. Giorgio Vasari's description of frescoes in the church of Santa Maria Nuovo, Florence, illustrates the point. Accepting as fact the story of Andrea del Castagno's purported murder of a rival painter, Vasari claims the “malignant” Castagno unwittingly “painted himself with the face of Judas Iscariot, whom he resembled in both appearance and deed.”1 Although this example implies a oneto-one relationship between the artist and the subject he paints, reflexivity was also perceived in the artist's style. In essence style was viewed as a type of signature which, among other things, disclosed the gender of the maker. Accordingly, critics scrutinized images and objects for signs of strength and vigor (ardito, furioso, pugnato, virile, etc.) or indications of timidity and excessive care (arrendevole, stento, tenero, feminile, etc.). Not unexpectedly, these critical terms carried qualitative weight. Looking back at the cinquecento, the seventeenth-century critic Carlo Cesare Malvasia compared the style of the Bolognese painter Elisabetta Sirani (1638-65) to those of her forebears. Sirani,

From Fredrika Jacobs, Defining the Renaissance Virtuosa: Women Artists and the Language of
Art History (Cambridge University Press, 1997), 85-122. © Fredrika H. Jacobs. Reprinted with
permission.

-373-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Feminism and Renaissance Studies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Notes on Contributors vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - Humanism After Feminism 19
  • 1: Did Women Have a Renaissance? 21
  • 2: Women Humanists 48
  • 3: The Housewife and the Humanists 82
  • 4: The Tenth Muse 106
  • Part II - Historicizing Femininity 125
  • 5: The Notion of Woman in Medicine, Anatomy, and Physiology 127
  • 6: Women on Top 156
  • 7: The 'Cruel Mother' 186
  • 8: Witchcraft and Fantasy in Early Modern Germany 203
  • Part III 231
  • 9: Diana Described 233
  • 10: Literary Fat Ladies and the Generation of the Text 249
  • 11: Margaret Cavendish and the Romance of Contract 286
  • 12: Surprising Fame 317
  • Part IV - Women's Agency 337
  • 13: Women on Top in the Pamphlet Literature of the English Revolution 339
  • 14: La Donnesca Mano 373
  • 15: Guilds, Male Bonding and Women's Work in Early Modern Germany 412
  • 16: Language, Power, and the Law 428
  • 17: Finding a Voice 450
  • Bibliography 468
  • Index 475
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 480

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.