Feminism and Renaissance Studies

By Lorna Hutson | Go to book overview

Index
Note: Page numbers in italics refer to illustrations, but there may also be textual references on that page. The letters 'fn' refer to footnotes on that page.
Abel, E. 58, 59
Accati, Luisa 207
Addison 258, 274
Adelmann, H. B. 129, 137
adultery 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 205, 431, 436-7, 439, 441, 445
Akakia, Martinus 144
Alberti, Leon Battista 6, 325, 375
Alciati, Andrea 270, 385, 386, 388
Alessandra del Milanese 395
Alpers, Svetlana 13
Amazons 53, 56, 160, 162, 163, 171fn, 172
Amussen, Susan 340
Anguissola, Sofonisba 377-8, 379, 386, 387
Aquinas, St. Thomas 25, 130, 132, 144
Archilei, Antonio (Vimercati) 452, 453, 454, 457
Archilei, Vittoria 451-62
Ariosto 117, 252, 254
Aristotle 127-9, 130, 131, 133, 137, 138-9, 140, 146, 321
Armenini, Giovambattista 375, 376, 384
Armstrong, Nancy 83-4
artists 373-405
Ascham, Roger 252, 256
Astell, Mary 170-1
Atanagi, Dionigi 384, 389-90
Attaway, Mrs. 360-1
Auden, W. H. 274
Augustine of Hippo, St. 257
Austen, Jane 277-8
Aylmer, John 157
Baglione, Giovanni 378, 379, 380, 383, 390
Baldinucci, Filippo 380, 388, 396
Barbaro, Francesco 319, 321-2, 385
Barber, C. L. 261
Bargagli, Girolamo 456
Barkan, Leonard 237
Barnes, Thomas 173
Barthes, Roland 254, 276
Bartolomeo, Fra 397, 399, 400, 401, 402
Basile, Adriana 452, 456
Basso, Ercole 390
Bauhin, Gaspard 132, 140
Beatrice of Die, Countess 29
Beaujeu, Anne de 318
Beckett, Samuel 278
Becon, Thomas 82
Behn, Aphra 158fn.
Belsey, Catherine 84
Bembo, Pietro 39, 41
Bernheimer, Richard 166fn.
Bernini, Gian Lorenzo 386-7, 401
Black, Anthony 423
Bloch, Ernst 278
Bloch, Marc 24
Blondel, J. A. 142
Boccaccio 57, 163, 164, 190, 377, 401
Bocchi, Francesco 396, 403
Bonacciuoli 141, 144
Bonini, Severo 456
Borgo, Damiano 55
Botticelli 388
Bourignon, Antoinette 172
Bowtell, Stephen 114
Bradstreet, Anne 106, 107-8, 109, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118
Brandolini, Vincenza 395
Brathwaite, Richard 321
Brown, David 358-9
Bruegel 160, 166fn.-7fn.
Bruni, Leonardo 38, 50-1, 52, 53, 60, 87, 318
Bruto, Giovanni 318-19
Bryson, Norman 392-4
Bullinger, Heinrich 82, 84, 96
Burckhardt, Jacob 1, 4, 7-8
Butler, Judith 438
Caccini, Giulio 450-1, 454, 457-8, 460, 461
Calleja, Diego 115
Calvin, Jean 157, 159, 160
Cambi, Prudenza 395
Cantona, Caterina 394, 395, 404
Capellanus, Andreas 24, 25, 27, 30, 31, 258

-475-

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Feminism and Renaissance Studies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Notes on Contributors vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - Humanism After Feminism 19
  • 1: Did Women Have a Renaissance? 21
  • 2: Women Humanists 48
  • 3: The Housewife and the Humanists 82
  • 4: The Tenth Muse 106
  • Part II - Historicizing Femininity 125
  • 5: The Notion of Woman in Medicine, Anatomy, and Physiology 127
  • 6: Women on Top 156
  • 7: The 'Cruel Mother' 186
  • 8: Witchcraft and Fantasy in Early Modern Germany 203
  • Part III 231
  • 9: Diana Described 233
  • 10: Literary Fat Ladies and the Generation of the Text 249
  • 11: Margaret Cavendish and the Romance of Contract 286
  • 12: Surprising Fame 317
  • Part IV - Women's Agency 337
  • 13: Women on Top in the Pamphlet Literature of the English Revolution 339
  • 14: La Donnesca Mano 373
  • 15: Guilds, Male Bonding and Women's Work in Early Modern Germany 412
  • 16: Language, Power, and the Law 428
  • 17: Finding a Voice 450
  • Bibliography 468
  • Index 475
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