Mathletics: How Gamblers, Managers, and Sports Enthusiasts Use Mathematics in Baseball, Basketball, and Football

By Wayne Winston | Go to book overview

PREFACE

If you have picked up this book you surely love sports and you probably like math. You may have read Michael Lewis's great book Moneyball, which describes how the Oakland A's used mathematical analysis to help them compete successfully with the New York Yankees even though the average annual payroll for the A's is less than 40 percent of that of the Yankees. After reading Moneyball, you might have been curious about how the math models described in the book actually work. You may have heard how a former night watchman, Bill James, revolutionized the way baseball professionals evaluate players. You probably want to know exactly how James and other “sabermetricians” used mathematics to change the way hitters, pitchers, and fielders are evaluated. You might have heard about the analysis of Berkeley economic professor David Romer that showed that NFL teams should rarely punt on fourth down. How did Romer use mathematics to come up with his controversial conclusion? You might have heard how Mark Cuban used math models (and his incredible business savvy) to revitalize the moribund Dallas Mavericks franchise. What mathematical models does Cuban use to evaluate NBA players and lineups? Maybe you bet once in a while on NFL games and wonder whether math can help you do better financially. How can math determine the true probability of a team winning a game, winning the NCAA tournament, or just covering the point spread? Maybe you think the NBA could have used math to spot Tim Donaghy's game fixing before being informed about it by the FBI. This book will show you how a statistical analysis would have “red flagged” Donaghy as a potential fixer.

If Moneyball or day- to- day sports viewing has piqued your interest in how mathematics is used (or can be used) to make decisions in sports and sports gambling, this book is for you. I hope when you finish reading the book you will love math almost as much as you love sports.

To date there has been no book that explains how the people running Major League Baseball, basketball, and football teams and Las Vegas sports bookies use math. The goal of Mathletics is to demonstrate how simple

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mathletics: How Gamblers, Managers, and Sports Enthusiasts Use Mathematics in Baseball, Basketball, and Football
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 358

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.