War Stories: The Causes and Consequences of Public Views of War

By Matthew A. Baum; Tim J. Groeling | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
Shot by the Messenger
AN EXPERIMENTAL EXAMINATION OF THE EFFECTS
OF PARTY CUES ON PUBLIC OPINION REGARDING
NATIONAL SECURITY AND WAR

REPUBLICAN CANDIDATES have famously argued that the media are biased against their candidates, perhaps best exemplified by a popular 1992 bumper sticker reading, “Annoy the Media: Re- elect George Bush.” However, with the rise of the Fox News Channel, Democrats have mounted specific, targeted attempts to marginalize and delegitimize what they argue is a pro-Republican news outlet. For instance, in early 2007, liberal activists pressured the Nevada Democratic Party to cancel a Fox- sponsored Democratic candidate debate. In launching the successful campaign to drop Fox as a debate sponsor, liberal blogger Chris Bowers of MyDD. com argued that “instead of giving [Fox] a golden opportunity to further distort the image of Democratic presidential candidates, and instead of providing them with credibility for all of their past and future attacks against Democrats, it would be best if the Nevada Democratic Party chose a different media partner to broadcast this debate” (Bowers 2007).1 Shortly before the 2008 presidential election, in turn, then- Democratic nominee Barack Obama offered the following speculation:

I am convinced that if there were no Fox News, I might be two or three
points higher in the polls. If I were watching Fox News, I wouldn't vote
for me, right? Because the way I'm portrayed 24/7 is as a freak! I am
the latte- sipping, New York Times-reading, Volvo- driving, no-gun-
owning, effete, politically correct, arrogant liberal. Who wants some-
body like that? I guess the point I'm making is that there is an entire

1The cited cause for the cancellation was a joke by Fox News chairman Roger Ailes
conflating Barack Obama with Osama Bin Laden. Ailes responded to the boycott by com-
plaining that pressure groups were now urging candidates to “only appear on those net-
works and venues that give them favorable coverage” (Whitcomb 2007). While Fox and the
Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) later agreed to co-sponsor one Republican and one
Democratic candidate debate, activist groups immediately sought to pressure both the CBC
and Democratic candidates to withdraw from the debate (Phillips 2007). The Democratic
National Committee subsequently declined to sanction it, and the three major Democratic
candidates also declined to participate, leading to the indefinite postponement of the debate.

-114-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
War Stories: The Causes and Consequences of Public Views of War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures ix
  • Tables xiii
  • Preface xv
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Chapter 1: News, Opinion, and Foreign Policy 1
  • Chapter 2: Politics Across the Water's Edge 17
  • Chapter 3: Elite Rhetoric, Media Coverage, and Rallying 'Round the Flag 46
  • Chapter 4: War Meets the Press 89
  • Chapter 5: Shot by the Messenger 114
  • Chapter 6: Tidings of Battle 149
  • Chapter 7: “Reality Asserted Itself” 186
  • Chapter 8: Barbarians Inside the Gates 230
  • Chapter 9: Back to the Future 284
  • References 297
  • Index 315
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 330

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.