The E-Policy Handbook: Rules and Best Practices to Safely Manage Your Company's E-Mail, Blogs, Social Networking, and Other Electronic Communication Tools

By Nancy Flynn | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 23
How to Communicate
Online Without
Getting Fired
Ten Tips for Employees Who Want to Protect
Their Privacy2014and Keep Their Jobs

Tip 1: Know That Big Brother Is Reading over Your Electronic Shoulder

There simply is no privacy in cyberspace. Employers, law enforcement agencies, courts, regulators, the media, and the public are likely to ac- cess your online transmissions, posts, and history one day2014if they haven2019t done so already.

When it comes to workplace computer monitoring, U.S. employers are primarily concerned about inappropriate Web surfing, with 66 per- cent of bosses watching workers2019 Internet connections, and another 45 percent tracking content, keystrokes, and time spent at the keyboard.

An additional 43 percent of U.S. employers monitor employee e-mail, either taking advantage of technology to accomplish the job auto- matically (73 percent) or assigning an individual to manually read and review workers2019 messages (40 percent).

Employee use of new and emerging technologies is under scrutiny at work, too, according to the 2007 Electronic Monitoring and Surveil- lance Survey from American Management Association and ePolicy Insti- tute. Twelve percent of bosses regularly monitor the blogosphere, and

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