Working for Change: Making a Career in International Public Service

By Derick W. Brinkerhoff; Jennifer M. Brinkerhoff | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
Serving in Community

Public service is rarely a solitary endeavor. There may be times when you undertake some individual piece of analysis or reflection, but for the most part service to bring about change involves working with and through other people. As that overused slogan “Think globally, act locally” conveys, when you work with people directly it happens in the context of a distinct subset of individuals or social groups, which, for shorthand, is often referred to as a community.1 Working in community goes to the heart of working for change. As Najma Siddiqi (Profile 3) puts it, I don't think I have ever gone as a lone ranger. I don't think I can do that. If I'm interested in bringing about change in society, then I can't do it by myself. More specifically, she reflects on the origins of her path, working with women. I was interested in the situation of women, and how they were excluded from major policy decisions, personal decisions, societal decisions, and political roles. So how do you change that? You have to go back and see why that is happening. And you want to see how you can begin to bring about change there. You can't change it overnight. You can't, you know. You have to work with all kinds of people, you have to understand all kinds of interests, and you have to start working from there.

Working for change requires working with others. In the previous chapter, we encouraged you to develop self-awareness, including reflection on what development means to you. Having done so, you may feel that now you've clarified your thinking and are ready to make your vision a reality through working with the community that your career choice at this particular moment puts you in contact with. You've got your skills, your idealism, your vision, and you're ready to get out there and make your chosen community a better place. So what's wrong with this picture?

As Najma Siddiqi's quote suggests, your understanding, goals, and vision are only one side of the equation. The people you want to work with have understandings, goals, and visions of their own, along with a

-59-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Working for Change: Making a Career in International Public Service
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 224

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.