Comparative Semitic Philology in the Middle Ages: From Sa'Adiah Gaon to Ibn Barun (10th-12th C.)

By Aharon Maman; David Lyons | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SIXTEEN
THE
CHART OF COMPARISONS

In the following chart, I have assembled and set out all the comparisons presently known to occur in the works examined in the present study. In the right-hand column, the comparison itself appears, in a condensed form, as necessitated by the format of this chart and in the columns to the left, I have allocated one column for each grammarian, in chronological order. The grammarians from whose works little has survived, or who recorded relatively few comparisons ab initio, are placed together in one column—col. 8: Various Hebrew Grammarians. In these columns, some symbol appears for each comparison encountered in the records of that grammarian: the symbols used are: +, =, or some other mark. These markings enable the reader to obtain a bird's-eye view of the materials recorded anew by that grammarian vis-à-vis his predecessors (as well as what he failed to record), which of the comparisons he endorsed or objected to, etc. But perusal of the chart is not to be taken by the reader as a dispensation from referring in detail to the study of the Hebrew grammarians itself; in the chart, I could include neither the connotation emanating from the comparison nor (in most cases) the noncognate adduced by the grammarian together with the cognate. It also goes without saying that the chart cannot reflect, the comparison method of the grammarian.

Sigla used in the chart:

* before the comparison signifies comparison with Aramaic.

x before the comparison signifies that the entry word treated (i.e., to the right of the comparison diagonal) derives from rabbinic Hebrew.

= in the columns for the grammarians signifies that the comparison entered in col. 1 is recorded by the respective grammarian, verbatim.

+ in the columns for the grammarians signifies that the comparison entered in col. 1 is recorded by that grammarian with a formulaic alteration or a variant citation.

? in the columns for the grammarians signifies that the comparison entered in col. 1 is an “uncertain comparison.”

-413-

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