Jasmine and Stars: Reading More Than Lolita in Tehran

By Fatemeh Keshavarz | Go to book overview

5 The Good, the Missing, and the Faceless
What Is Wrong with Reading Lolita in Tehran

We have come a long way together. I have led you from the summer nights of my childhood in Shiraz to the high school where you met my friends Zohreh and Minoo. On my way to graduate school in London, I have introduced you to the Eternal Forough, who voiced our earthly rebellion, and to my uncle the painter. You have seen the ancient silver spoon that gave me the courage to voice my discontent and caught a glimpse of the old man who had memorized an entire collection of poems. I have also shared with you many of the gifts that my family gave me, including the understanding that the sacred is immeasurable, that it has as many faces as I can uncover for myself.

In these stories, you have heard laughter and sensed generosity and love. As I went through painful experiences such as my divorce, the presence of friends, relatives, and sometimes total strangers healed me and brought color and happiness back to my life. In fact, I am touched once more by the warmth emanating from each little anecdote as I recount it to you after all these years.

I am not always sure why I must share a specific story except that I believe something in it will resonate with you. And that bit floats to the surface only after the story is told. The delight I took in the find-the-original painting game that my uncle played with us is one example. Discovering which card was the original and which the painted copy was not what really mattered in that game at all. What mattered was the joy of playing and our appreciation for his artful and dignified living.

The stories are my personal gift to you (and in some ways to me). Telling them in English, and celebrating the joyful memories they contain with you, transforms these anecdotes. You could say I remake them into little two-way bridges that keep my Iranian and American selves connected. In their new linguistic habitat, these memories will mingle and live side by side with other stories from my life for ever. And who will deny that bridge building is the thing to do in this age of transnationalism fractured by fear of

-109-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Jasmine and Stars: Reading More Than Lolita in Tehran
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 175

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.