A Gallery to Play To: The Story of the Mersey Poets

By Phil Bowen | Go to book overview

4
Liverpool
1957–1961

'Where's the best place to buy a pair of winklepickers?'

In the 1950s, with the exception of Soho, the only place for any aspirational painter, poet, musician, bohemian or 'bon viveur' on a tight budget was Liverpool 8. The area was described by George Melly in The Observer as a 'multi-racial slum waiting in raddled beauty for the planners' bulldozers', and more positively in Adrian Henri's prose-poem 'Liverpool 8' as a place 'where you play out after tea Back doors and walls / with names, kisses scrawled or painted A new cathedral at the end of Hope Street …Wind / blowing inland from Pierhead bringing the smell of breweries / and engine oil from ferry boats.'

In his introduction to The Liverpool Scene (published in 1967), Edward Lucie-Smith took a more expansive view:

The city continues to think of itself as something pretty special. The
most obvious thing about Liverpool at the moment is that [it] has a lot
of feathers in its cap Liverpool knows its own standards and imposes
them firmly.

Unlike Soho, Liverpool 8 in the 1950s was bereft of clip-joints and nightclubs such as the Mandrake, or pubs like the Fitzroy Tavern and the Golden Lion, with their blatant disregard for licensing laws, conventional sexuality and outwardly respectable behaviour. In Liverpool, closing time meant ten o'clock, so a place to make the most of one's allotted drinking time was essential. The place in the heart of Liverpool 8 that provided such a service was Ye Cracke. Formerly the Ruthin Castle, it acquired its name around 1900. Squeezed between two larger buildings, one of which was the War Office, its owners were the renowned Liverpool publican family the Egertons. Here the main attraction, the long-suffering landlady Doris, would dispense beer to the whole of Liverpool's bohemia crammed into one small bar. On a good

-31-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Gallery to Play To: The Story of the Mersey Poets
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 198

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.