Deeper Than Reason: Emotion and Its Role in Literature, Music, and Art

By Jenefer Robinson | Go to book overview

Index
Abrams, M. H. 439
aesthetic attitude 131–32
aesthetic ideas 233
affect programmes 36, 68, 88–89, 91–3
defined 92
affective priming 39–40, 63
Affektenlehre 462 n.5
Albers, Josef 254, 444
Albinoni, Tomaso, Adagio 369, 371
Alfven, Hugo, Midsommarvaka 369, 371, 375
amae 80
Ambassadors, The 112–3, 122–3, 125–30, 133, 142–3, 426
amusement, 88 112–3, 126–8, 179–80, 375
amygdala 49, 50–3, 61, 71, 407
Ancient Egyptians 262, 272
anger:
Aristotle's definition of 8
in artistic expression 273–5
in coping, 201–2
core relational theme of, 198
labelling of, 84–9
non-cognitive appraisal in, 65–8, 78
philosophical theories of 6–7, 10–16, 26
physiological changes in 30–3, 37–8, 47, 92, 419 n.24
anguish 88, 256, 266–7, 283, 285, 319, 320, 358–9, 410, 412
Anna Karenina 108–11, 113–4, 116, 122–8, 130–4, 138–40, 142, 144–8, 150–2, 367, 425, 430 n.31
annoyance, 7, 33, 87
anxiety 30, 87, 176, 182
and core relational theme 13, 16
and coping 198, 201
in Meyer's theory of musical understanding 361, 367
in response to music 358, 368–70, 373–5
and non-cognitive appraisals 64–5, 68
in The Scream 282–3
Apostoleris, Nicholas H. 423 n.32
appraisal, cognitive see appraisal, non-cognitive; appraisal, primary and secondary; emotion, judgement theory of; emotion and cognitive monitoring; emotion catalogued in recollection; emotion, labelling of; emotion as process
appraisal, non-cognitive 41–7, 50–6, 58–61, 95–98, 197–9, 272–3, 290–1
in affect programmes 91–94
characterized 45, 62
as succeeded by cognition 75–80, 84–91
as provoked by complex cognitions 70–5
different ways of conceptualizing 61–70, 422 n.18, 423–4 n.33
in coping 202–3, 207, 212, 219
in emotional involvement with fictional characters 113–7, 121–30, 140–5, 151–3, 176, 183
in responses to music 304, 309–11, 364–5, 386, 391–4, 400–4
in The Reef 156–8, 166–8, 171–2, 174
appraisal, primary and secondary 67, 75–6, 198–202, 212, 423 n.19
Arab Horseman attacked by a Lion 281–82, 291
see also Delacroix
Aristotle 8, 28, 154–5, 231, 397, 415, 439, 462 n.4
Arnold, Matthew 437 n.35–6
see also “Dover Beach”
Aron, Arthur P. 402
“Art as Expression” 266–70
Auchincloss, Louis 188, 192
autism 427, n.40
autonomic nervous system changes 35–6, 43, 48–9, 58–9, 74, 92–3, 114, 117, 129, 290, 310–1, 370–2, 395–6, 405, 410, 419 n.24

-487-

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Deeper Than Reason: Emotion and Its Role in Literature, Music, and Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Contents xiii
  • List of Figures xv
  • Part One - What Are Emotions and How Do They Operate? 1
  • 1: Emotions as Judgements 5
  • 2: Boiling of the Blood 28
  • 3: Emotion as Process 57
  • Part Two - Emotion in Literature 101
  • 4: The Importance of Being Emotional 105
  • 5: Puzzles and Paradoxes 136
  • 6: A Sentimental Education 154
  • 7: Formal Devices as Coping Mechanisms 195
  • Part Three - Expressing Emotion in the Arts 229
  • 8: Pouring Forth the Soul 231
  • 9: A New Romantic Theory of Expression 258
  • Part Four - Music and the Emotions 293
  • 10: Emotional Expression in Music 295
  • 11: The Expression of Emotion in Instrumental Music 322
  • 12: Listening with Emotion: How Our Emotions Help Us to Understand Music 348
  • 13: Feeling the Music 379
  • 14: Epilogue 413
  • Notes 415
  • Bibliography 469
  • Index 487
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