A Futile and Stupid Gesture: How Doug Kenney and National Lampoon Changed Comedy Forever

By Josh Karp | Go to book overview

7
Show Biz and Dead Dogs

“We were tight like a family. And I mean that in the worst”
possible way.

—P. J. O'Rourke

The following things happened in 1973: the American League instituted the designated-hitter rule; Nixon took the oath of office for the second time; Lyndon Johnson died of a heart attack; Kiss played its first show; the Senate formed the Watergate Committee with Sam Ervin as its chair; Elton John's “Crocodile Rock” topped the pop charts; Picasso died; 63 percent of Americans believed that the Nixon administration had been neither frank nor honest about Watergate; Secretariat won the Triple Crown; Nixon's lawyer John Dean testified about the existence of a White House “enemies list”; and Billie Jean King defeated Bobby Riggs in the “Battle of the Sexes.”

-152-

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A Futile and Stupid Gesture: How Doug Kenney and National Lampoon Changed Comedy Forever
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction - Midas at the Marmont xi
  • 1: Hayley Mills in Pleasantville 1
  • 2: The Most Perfect Wasp 18
  • 3: Here Is New York 41
  • 4: You've Got a Weird Mind. You'll Fit in Well Here 58
  • 5: What Do Women Eat? 91
  • 6: Hitler Being Difficult 118
  • 7: Show Biz and Dead Dogs 152
  • 8: Guns and Sandwiches 198
  • 9: The Pirates 237
  • 10: The Cultural Revolution 263
  • 11: Fuck the Proposal 283
  • 12: Round Up the Usual Jews 302
  • 13: Pheasant Shake for Mr. Kenney 327
  • 14: A Year with No Spring 348
  • Epilogue 371
  • Bibliography 379
  • Index 392
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