Working World: Careers in International Education, Exchange, and Development

By Sherry L. Muller; Mark Overmann | Go to book overview

Chapter 5
ob Search—A General Approach

Cast the net wide. Search broadly. See what's out there.

One of the greatest myths regarding the job search, international or otherwise, is that you should only be looking for open positions. It's true that the immediate goal of your job search is to land a job, and the position that you get at this time will have to be one that is currently available. In searching for those open positions, however, do not hesitate to explore the wide array of possibilities with an open mind. Check out jobs that you may not yet be qualified for but might someday be interested in. Dig deeper into organizations that do not have job openings at the moment but have missions that excite you and are doing work you would like to do.

The career resources noted in this chapter—specifically the job boards and search engines—can be great sources of information. This is not only because they supply the specific details of available positions but also because they give you a better idea of the enormous variety of jobs that exists. Many career websites give the option of researching jobs, companies, organizations, and industries and often provide articles and other advice for job seekers. The panoply of players on the international scene has expanded so much in recent decades that it is difficult for any one person to grasp the full range of possibilities. Using these tools to cast your net wide and discover what's out there will help immensely in this process.

This approach holds true not just for those who are in the market for a new job but also for those who, though they are currently in a stable job and have no immediate intention of leaving, might someday decide to seek change or greater challenges. According to the career and networking website Jibber Jobber (www.jibberjobber.com), everyone is a job seeker. Some are active job seekers—those looking to start a new job as soon as possible—while some are passive job seekers who are only ex-

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