Fabulating Beauty: Perspectives on the Fiction of Peter Carey

By Andreas Gaile | Go to book overview

Bringing Australia Home
Peter Carey, the Booker, and the Repatriation of
Australian Culture

KAREN LAMB

S INCE THE PUBLICATION OF PETER CAREY'S LATEST WORK, My Life as a Fake (2003), its author has received extra ordinary media attention, particularly on his frequent visits to Australia to promote the book. In almost every public utterance, Carey has taken pains to direct attention towards his new novel and its core intrigue: that one can imagine an untruth into full being, that myth can become reality. Ironically, these imaginative preoccupations are by no means remote from the circumstances in which Carey now finds himself – an author struggling to separate his literary achievements and aims from the near-mythical figure, created in the media, of the “famous Booker Prize-winning Australian author Peter Carey.” A publicist may argue that this is a wholly positive outcome, but the publicity multiplier effect of winning the British Booker Prize for fiction is not all advantage: this most prominent award drives a process of cultural iconography that is every bit as protean and powerful as any of Carey's fictions. Moreover, a marriage between the effects of a global, commercially driven book culture and the national speaking position Carey occupies as a celebrity-status Australian author may not boast the positive outcome for literature, or Australia, that is currently keeping the publishers and booksellers smiling – not if his main public role is as “an import–export industry for rebadged Australiana.”1

1 Luke Slattery, “The Curse of Ern Malley,” Weekend Australian (26 July 2003): 7.

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Fabulating Beauty: Perspectives on the Fiction of Peter Carey
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 438

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.