The Politics of Secularism in International Relations

By Elizabeth Shakman Hurd | Go to book overview

Select Bibliography

Abou El Fadl, Khaled. Islam and the Challenge of Democracy. Edited by Joshua Cohen and Deborah Chasman. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2004.

Abrahamian, Ervand. Iran between Two Revolutions. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1982.

Abrams, Elliot (Ed.). The Influence of Faith: Religious Groups and U.S. Foreign Policy. New York: Rowman & Littlefield, 2001.

Adler, Emanuel, and Michael Barnett (Eds.). Security Communities. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.

Afary, Janet, and Kevin B. Anderson. Foucault and the Iranian Revolution: Gender and the Seductions of Islamism. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005.

———. “The Seductions of Islamism: Revisiting Foucault and the Iranian Revolution.” New Politics 10, no. 1 (Summer 2004): 113–22.

Ahmad, Mumtaz. “Political Islam: Can It Become a Loyal Opposition?” Forum, Middle East Policy Council, Washington, D.C., May 14, 1996.

Al-' Azm, Sadik Jalal. “Orientalism and Orientalism in Reverse.” Khamsin 8 (1981): 5–26.

Algar, Hamid (Trans.). Islam and Revolution. Berkeley: Mizan Press, 1981.

Allison, Robert J. The Crescent Obscured: The United States and the Muslim World, 1776–1815. 2nd ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000.

al-Masseri, Abdulwahab. “The Imperialist Epistemological Vision.” American Journal of Islamic Social Sciences 11, no. 3 (1994): 403–15.

Amuzegar, Jahangir. “Iran's Crumbling Revolution.” Foreign Affairs 82, no. 1 (January–February 2003): 44–57.

Anderson, Benedict. Imagined Communities. London: Verso, 1983.

Appleby, R. Scott. The Ambivalence of the Sacred: Religion, Violence, and Reconciliation. Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 2000.

Arendt, Hannah. The Human Condition. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1958.

———. On Revolution. New York: Viking, 1963.

———. “What Is Authority?” In Between Past and Future: Eight Exercises in Political Thought, pp. 91–142. New York: Viking, 1968.

Arjomand, Said Amir. The Turban for the Crown: The Islamic Revolution in Iran. New York: Oxford University Press, 1988.

Arkoun, Mohammed. Rethinking Islam: Common Questions, Uncommon Answers. Edited by and translated by Robert D. Lee. Boulder: Westview Press, 1994.

Asad, Muhammad. The Principles of State and Government in Islam. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1961.

Asad, Talal. “Anthropology and the Analysis of Ideology.” Man 14, no. 4 (1979): 607–27.

———. Formations of the Secular: Christianity, Islam, Modernity. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2003.

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The Politics of Secularism in International Relations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - Varieties of Secularism 23
  • Chapter Three - Secularism and Islam 46
  • Chapter Four - Contested Secularisms in Turkey and Iran 65
  • Chapter Five - The European Union and Turkey 84
  • Chapter Six - The United States and Iran 102
  • Chapter Seven - Political Islam 116
  • Chapter Eight - Religious Resurgence 134
  • Chapter Nine - Conclusion 147
  • Notes 155
  • Select Bibliography 213
  • Index 237
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