Law in Crisis: The Ecstatic Subject of Natural Disaster

By Ruth A. Miller | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FOUR
Respect in Death
Ghouls and Corpses

Introduction

I started the previous chapter with a discussion of Mary Schloendorff's phantom tumor and the political and legal regime that created it. This chapter begins with a ghost of a different sort—far more active than Schloendorff's tumor and central to the following three anecdotes.

In the first, a young German woman, Miss Trauer, becomes engaged to a lieutenant in the Nazi army, whom she then marries in September 1940, three months after he is killed in the north of France. As Edouard Conte and Cornelia Essner put it in their La Quête de la Race, “by the grace of the Fuhrer and the Chancellor of the Reich, death could not separate [the fiancés].”1 According to Conte and Essner, the dead German soldier could even divorce his widow if she was unfaithful to, or behaved in an undignified manner toward, his memory or the German people.2

The second anecdote concerns the publication of the Italian fascist criminal code, which went into effect in 1930. In this code, the chapter on Crimes Against Respect Due to the Dead becomes gradually more central to Italian law in general—the dead body an object of intense scrutiny on the part of the state, regulated in detail, and protected above all from any living individual who might commit upon it acts of brutality or obscenit?”3

The third story arises out of the U.S. military's 2003 invasion and occupation of Iraq. In this story, dead American soldiers become the most recognizable sub-

-85-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Law in Crisis: The Ecstatic Subject of Natural Disaster
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Cultural Lives of Law ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - Writing About Disaster Metaphors in Crisis 33
  • Chapter Three - The Gift of Life Blood, Organs, and Viruses 52
  • Chapter Four - Respect in Death Ghouls and Corpses 85
  • Chapter Five - Seismic Space Camps, Cemeteries, Squares, and Monuments 120
  • Chapter Six - Conclusion 174
  • Reference Matter 183
  • Notes 185
  • Bibliography 221
  • Index 233
  • The Cultural Lives of Law 239
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 239

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.