Law in Crisis: The Ecstatic Subject of Natural Disaster

By Ruth A. Miller | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter One

1. Unless otherwise noted, all translations are my own.

2. See, for instance, the extensive analysis of ecstasy in Judith Butler, Undoing Gender. New York and London: Routledge, 2004. pp. 19–21, 32–33, 148–151.

3. See, among others, Andrew M. Greeley, Ecstasy: A Way of Knowing. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1974; Carl W. Ernst, Words of Ecstasy in Sufism. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1985; James Rolleston, Narratives of Ecstasy: Romantic Temporality in Modern German Poetry. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1987; Felicitas D. Goodman, Ecstasy, Ritual, and Alternate Reality: Religion in a Pluralistic World. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1988; John J. Collins and Michael Fishbane, eds., Death, Ecstasy, and Other Worldly Journeys. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1995; Jill Marsden, After Nietzsche: Notes Towards a Philosophy of Ecstasy. New York: Palgrave, 2002.

4. Although this idea was a common theme among classical Greek, Roman, and medieval thinkers. See Ecstasy and Subjectivity in this chapter..

5. As in Daniel A. Farber and Jim Chen, Disasters and the Law: Katrina and Beyond. New York: Aspen Publishers, 2006.

6. As Nikolas Rose, Pat O'Malley, and Mariana Valverde argue in their discussion of Foucault's theories of governmentality, the intrinsic relationship between government and ethics linked Foucault's arguments into the lively debates at that time [the early 1980s] concerning the question of the subject. During the 1970s, many had argued that the constitution of subjectivity was a key political issue; that capitalism required the production of subjects who imagined themselves to be autonomous, self-possessed, bounded, agentive individuals; and that radical thought needed to question this imaginary relation through semiotics or through a certain version of (French) psychoanalysis.”

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Law in Crisis: The Ecstatic Subject of Natural Disaster
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Cultural Lives of Law ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - Writing About Disaster Metaphors in Crisis 33
  • Chapter Three - The Gift of Life Blood, Organs, and Viruses 52
  • Chapter Four - Respect in Death Ghouls and Corpses 85
  • Chapter Five - Seismic Space Camps, Cemeteries, Squares, and Monuments 120
  • Chapter Six - Conclusion 174
  • Reference Matter 183
  • Notes 185
  • Bibliography 221
  • Index 233
  • The Cultural Lives of Law 239
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