Time's River: Archaeological Syntheses from the Lower Mississippi River Valley

By Janet Rafferty; Evan Peacock | Go to book overview
Save to active project

16
Culture Contact along
the I-69 Corridor
Protohistoric and Historic Use of the
Northern Yazoo Basin, Mississippi

Ian W. Brown


Introduction

One might think that it would be relatively easy to discuss the Protohistoric (A.D. 1541–1673) and Historic aboriginal (A.D. 1674–1730) occupations of the northern Yazoo Basin. After all, this is the time when Europeans were on the scene, either indirectly or directly, so there should be ample written documentation available to chart the life and movements of the indigenous inhabitants. That indeed would be the case had the region continued to experience use on the same level as it had prior to 1541, but that did not happen. A massive depopulation occurred in the region in the late sixteenth or early seventeenth centuries, probably brought about by the onset of disease (Ramenofsky 1987: 42–71). Consequently, we know less about life processes during these two centuries than for any other time in the culture chronology of northwest Mississippi. The irony of the matter is that this region experienced an intensity of occupation during the Late Mississippian period, so much so that the participants of the de Soto Entrada have left us with far more information about the lifeways of Mississippian people in the northern Yazoo Basin than elsewhere. This region should be a perfect arena for a study of culture contact, if only we could find sites that existed during this dynamic time.

Culture contact implies the coming together of two peoples of different autonomous cultural traditions (SSRC 1954: 974–975). It also suggests a degree of change and continuity as the less technologically inclined society attempts to maintain stability under the influences of newly introduced items and all the cultural baggage that comes with them. This is a topic that numerous people have wrestled with in adjacent regions to the south of the study area (Brain 1979, 1988; Brain et al. 1994; Brown 1979a, 1985; Neitzel 1965, 1983). The nature and effects of culture contact are difficult to deal with ethnographically, even

-357-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Time's River: Archaeological Syntheses from the Lower Mississippi River Valley
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 552

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.