Long, Obstinate, and Bloody: The Battle of Guilford Courthouse

By Lawrence E. Babits; Joshua B. Howard | Go to book overview

Such a complicated scene of horror and distress, it is hoped, for the sake of humanity, rarely occurs, even in military life. —CHARLES STEDMAN, The History of the Origin, Progress, and Termination of the American War (1794)


CHAPTER NINE THE AFTERMATH

Ever the keen strategist, Greene retreated to a predetermined rally point he had chosen before the battle, fully prepared that things might go wrong. He led his men to Speedwell Ironworks along Troublesome Creek, where “our baggage was previously ordered … 13 miles from the place of the action, where our army encamped the same evening.” Virginia militiaman John Chumbley wrote, “The army halted two to three miles from the battleground to take refreshment, and called stragglers, which being done, then proceeded through muddy roads … and cold driving rain 8 to 10 miles, to the iron works on what was called Troublesome Creek.” The British regiments, battered and exhausted, could not keep pace with the American army. Otho Holland Williams stated, “the enemy did not presume to press our rear with any spirit they followed only three miles where the regular troops halted and a great many of the militia formed.” Wary of a British attack, Greene ordered his army to construct earthworks. Officers were instructed to file reports of the men present and those missing, and the commissaries were ordered to distribute two days' rations, plus a gill of rum per man.1

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Long, Obstinate, and Bloody: The Battle of Guilford Courthouse
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations and Maps ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Introduction: The Strategic Situation 1
  • Chapter on E the Race to the Dan 13
  • Chapter Two: From the Dan to Guilford Courthouse 37
  • Chapter Three: Greene's Army 52
  • Chapter Four: The British Army Advances 79
  • Chapter Five: The First Line 100
  • Chapter Six: The Second Line 117
  • Chapter Seven: The Battle within a Battle 129
  • Chapter Eight: The Third Line 142
  • Chapter Nine: The Aftermath 170
  • Chapter Ten: The Guilford 190
  • Epilogue 214
  • Appendix A: Order of Battle 219
  • Appendix B: Battle Casualties 223
  • Appendix C: Postwar Location of Pensioners by State of Service 227
  • Glossary 229
  • A Note on Sources 235
  • Notes 239
  • Bibliography 269
  • Index 289
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