Long, Obstinate, and Bloody: The Battle of Guilford Courthouse

By Lawrence E. Babits; Joshua B. Howard | Go to book overview
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The event had caused him much unhappiness from its occurrence to the end of his life. —CAPT. THOMAS WATKINS, Virginia Militia Dragoons


CHAPTER TEN THE GUILFORD

“CROSSROADS”

By the first decade of the nineteenth century, the Guilford Courthouse village had ceased to exist, being subsumed by the town of Greensboro. For those men who fought at Guilford and survived the war, the battle became nothing but a memory, perhaps an intentionally repressed memory, of one incredible event in their past. Many of those who lived through the fighting at Guilford and their descendants went on to play significant roles in the history of their respective nations in the decades following the conflict.

Paroled after Yorktown, Cornwallis returned to New York, where he met with Gen. Sir Henry Clinton in late November. He returned to Britain the following month, having been exchanged for South Carolina rice merchant and Continental Congress delegate Henry Laurens. Cornwallis's surrender affected him surprisingly little, politically or socially, after the war. Clinton engaged him publicly in print over who deserved blame for the loss of the American colonies, but Cornwallis appears to have come out on top. In 1785, King George III appointed him special envoy to the court of Frederick the Great of Prussia and the following year named him governor-general of India. From 1786 to 1793, Cornwallis reorganized British rule in India. The

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