The Biographical Dictionary of Scottish Women: From the Earliest Times to 2004

By Elizabeth Ewan; Sue Innes et al. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

This Dictionary is in every sense a collective work. It arose out of a joint initiative: from the steering committee of the Scottish Women's History Network (re-named Women's History Scotland in 2005) and from Edinburgh University Press. The editors thank all the members of the Network for their help, encouragement and many authorial contributions, and John Davey of EUP for commissioning the project and seeing it through to within a few months of completion. We also wish to express heartfelt gratitude to Moira Burgess and Jane Rendall, who acted as associate editors to the project during the final months. They wrote and edited a number of entries that were originally commissioned by or allocated to our late colleague Sue Innes, whose illness prevented her from completing the work. Our greatest debt is, of course, to our contributors. This is their book.

Thanks are due to those copyright holders who gave their permission for us to reproduce textual material and illustrations (see captions to the Plates). The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (2004) was published before this work, and we are grateful to Robert Faber and Oxford University Press for their co-operation relating to modified entries written by authors who contributed to both publications.

A number of people were invited to act as editorial advisers to the initial project and throughout its gestation. We have greatly valued their expertise and advice on particular historical periods and fields of interest. Their names are listed on page viii. The editors also consulted other experts on various topics, several of whom deserve special mention: Christopher Dingwall (on gardeners), Lou Donovan (on science), John MacInnes (on Gaelic society), Lindy Moore (on education), Alison Robertson (on the churches).

Many archivists and librarians were of great help to us, in particular Gillian Whitley Roberts of the National Register of Archives for Scotland, Alison Fraser, Brian Smith (Orkney), Lesley Richmond (University of Glasgow), Moira Stewart and David Catto (Aberdeenshire Libraries). The staff of the National Library of Scotland, as always, offered much help. Deborah Hunter, Julie Lawson and other colleagues on the staff of the National Galleries of Scotland provided valuable assistance with picture research, as did Dorothy Kidd of the National Museums of Scotland.

Central to the management of the project was the electronic database which was specially designed by Frances Allen. Her creative expertise, goodwill and considerable patience have been of inexpressible value. The professional skills of all the following people have also been central to the project: Kath Davies evaluated and copy-edited the entries, and went well beyond her brief in refining the text and eliminating inaccuracies; Mary Henderson researched large numbers of obituaries; Flora Johnston joined the team to research and write entries where no secondary sources existed; Anne Lynas Shah did much essential genealogical research, tracking down details from often incomplete information, as well as editing some entries. Of EUP staff, Carol Macdonald, Anna Somerville and Mareike Weber were of great help in dealing with author contracts, and James Dale with editorial issues. Roda Morrison took over from John Davey to lend support and assistance in the final months, and Jackie Jones backed the project throughout.

This publication would not have been possible without funding for research, management, administration and editorial assistance. We are extremely grateful to those listed below for their generous contributions. We are also indebted to: Margaret Ford, Ray Perman and Eileen Yeo for their help in seeking funding; Eileen Yeo (Director of the Centre in Gender Studies, University of Strathclyde) for administering the grants received from the Strathmartine Trust; and Ann Kettle, treasurer of Women's History Scotland, for keeping the project accounts.

Anonymous private donors

Centre for Scottish Studies, the University of Stirling

College of Arts, University of Guelph, Canada

Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada

University of Strathclyde Centre in Gender Studies

-vi-

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The Biographical Dictionary of Scottish Women: From the Earliest Times to 2004
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Advisers to the Project viii
  • Contributors ix
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Readers' Guide xxiii
  • Introduction xxv
  • The Biographical Dictionary of Scottish Women 1
  • A 3
  • B 21
  • C 56
  • D 90
  • E 109
  • F 115
  • G 130
  • H 153
  • I 177
  • J 181
  • K 188
  • L 200
  • M 214
  • N 280
  • O 285
  • P 289
  • Q 294
  • R 295
  • S 310
  • T 350
  • U 358
  • V 359
  • W 361
  • Y 383
  • Z 384
  • Thematic Index 386
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