Dangerous Writing: Understanding the Political Economy of Composition

By Tony Scott | Go to book overview
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INDEX
academic writing 9, 19, 22, 24–25, 29, 69, 140
Alberti.John 4, 5, 6, 89, 117, 155, 163, 164
Anzaldua, Gloria 187–188
Apple, Michael 5, 159
Aronowitz, Stanley 160
assessment 7, 20, 55, 180–183
Bakhtin, Mikhail 27, 71, 139, 146–148, 173, 179
Bartholomae, David 24
Bauman, Zygmunt 112
Bawarshi, Anis 25, 72
Bazerman, Charles 25, 72
Beck, Ulrich, and Elisabeth Beck-Gemsheim 113
Beech, Jennifer 119–120
Berger, Peter L., and Thomas Luckmann 47,95
Berlin, James A. 30, 39–40, 172
Bizzell, Patricia 24, 79
Bleich, David 65, 67
Bourdieu, Pierre 27, 30, 47, 139, 144, 145, 149
Bousquet, Marc 184–185
Brandt, Deborah 9
Brereton, John C. 66, 67,107
bureaucracy (incl “bureaucrat”) 32, 45, 46; composition as practice of 42, 44, 45, 46–48, 50, 55–58, 139; distinction from professionalism 38, 43–48, 58; and graduate
learning 49–53; and textbooks 62, 67, 70, 79, 96. (See also “managerialism”)
class 6, 8, 14, 18, 23, 33, 34, 110–130; and contingent faculty 91, 115, 116, 129; and
culture 110, 113, 115; and relations of production 9, 14, 34, 110–117; and students 9, 114–120; and the writing requirement 39; as zombie category 113. (See also “working class”)
contingent faculty 5, 7, 19, 32, 35, 37, 52, 55, 56, 57, 115, 176, 184; and textbooks 53, 62, 64, 65, 66, 81, 83, 93; and psychic income 64
critical pedagogy 9, 27, 47, 112, 119–120, 141, 165
current traditionalism 49
Crowley, Sharon 20–22, 30, 39, 58, 97
de Certeau Michel 47
DeGenario, William 127–129
discourse community 24–25
Ede, Lisa 54
Ehrenreich, Barbara 131–134, 164, 174, 175
Enoch, Jessica 142
expressivism 26, 41, 49, 65, 70, 141
fast-capitalism; distinction with industrial capitalism 9, 115, 121–130, 132, 161; and higher education 5, 6, 8, 9, 18, 110, 112–113, 121, 137, 154, 158–160, 181; and sexual identification 119; and textbooks 64, 70; and writing pedagogy 26, 31, 33, 34, 113, 139–141, 163, 165, 166, 170, 187; and work 1, 4, 109, 110, 121–130, 155, 158, 160
figured worlds 10, 35, 139–149, 152, 153, 156, 169, 170, 171
Foucault, Michel 17, 72, 88
formalism 21, 41, 65, 71, 94, 98, 106, 174; new formalism 22, 36, 54, 100
Freire, Paulo 18, 23, 26, 141–142, 179
Gale, Xin Liu, and Frederic G. Gale 65
Gee, James Paul 32
Gee, James Paul, Glynda Hull, and Colin Lankshear 33, 158–159, 187
genre 25, 88, 158, 168, 172, 188; and narrative 147, 172; and textbooks 9, 33, 66–73, 100, 105, 106
Gig 121, 126–127, 129, 164
globalization 140, 162, 166, 190
Grabill.JeffereyT. 7, 116
Hage, Jerald, and Charles H. Powers 161
Hairston, Maxine 26
Harris, Joseph 22, 25, 28–29, 54, 100, 119
Heath, Shirley Brice 163
Herndl, Carl G., and Danny Bauer 142–143

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