Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

Anthropology and the New Cosmopolitanism: Rooted, Feminist and Vernacular Perspectives

By Pnina Werbner | Go to book overview

6
Islamic Cosmopolitics, Human Rights and
Anti-Violence Strategies in Indonesia

Kathryn Robinson


Introduction

Indonesia, the nation with the world's largest Islamic population, has been undergoing a process of continuous conversion since the thirteenth century. Like most of the Muslim world, Indonesian Muslims have engaged with the global Islamic renewal following the Iranian revolution. Since the authoritarian, centralising ruler Suharto was forced to resign in 1998, Indonesia designates itself as in a period of Reform (Reformasi) where competing visions for the form of the state and its fundamental values are in contestation. Political Islam, with philosophical (and sometimes organisational and financial) links to the Middle East for example, the ideas of the Muslim Brotherhood and its offshoots and a movement for gender equity, are important fractions in this emergent political flux.

The influence of reform traditions arising in the Middle East is not something new in Indonesia: Islamic modernism developed through the embrace of the ideas of Muhamad Abduh in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.1 Like earlier waves of Islam, the influences were expressed in a variety of organisational forms and through local debates and contestations. By the third decade of the twentieth century, Indonesian Islam had a political face, firmly harnessed to the anti-colonial and increasingly nationalist movement, and both the 'traditionalist' and 'modernist' strands of Indonesian Islam gave rise to political parties which competed in the free elections of the 1950s, in the new republic (Feith 1962).

Islamism is popularly associated with quintessentially communitarian politics, valorising the collective identity of the ummah over non-believers. However, for significant sectors of the contemporary Indonesian Islamic community, Islam is associated with cosmopolitan values, here understood as a commitment to 'the human' as 'a complex singularity over and above proximal categorisations and identifications of nation, ethnicity, class, religion, gender, locale and so on' (Rapport 2006: 23), a commitment to 'planetary conviviality' (Mignolo 2000:721) which in Indonesia is expressed in a commitment to 'pluralism'.2 In contemporary

-111-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Anthropology and the New Cosmopolitanism: Rooted, Feminist and Vernacular Perspectives
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 382

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.