Inside the Teaching Machine: Rhetoric and the Globalization of the U.S. Public Research University

By Catherine Chaput | Go to book overview

1
Historicizing the U.S. Public
Research University:
Industrial Capitalism and
the Professional Ideal

The socioeconomic category of “professional” emerged along with an expanding network of U.S. public research universities in the late nineteenth century. Together this national system of universities and its credentialed professionals solidified a largely dispersed middle class, helping to transform the United States from a nation of isolated rural communities into a sophisticated participant in the modern world. Various local universities existed within this network, trained a new professionalmanagerial class, and contributed significantly to the role of the United States in world politics. I explore this university system using the rhetorical hermeneutic of historical materialism by marking the valuation of the professional-managerial class within cultural, political, and economic spheres. Tracking the movement among the spheres simultaneously traces the rhetorical boundaries such valuations help construct and provides an opportunity to view the dialectic between this larger boundary and its local instantiations. With an eye toward history, this method attempts to understand how, as Gayatri Spivak says, “we are effects within a much larger text/tissue/weave of which the ends are not accessible to us” (“The Post-modern Condition” 25). The map I draw of the U.S. public research university should be seen as a small section of this pattern of social relations, one stitched in the late nineteenth century with the politics of nation-building, the economics of emergent capitalism, and the cultures of professionalism.

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Inside the Teaching Machine: Rhetoric and the Globalization of the U.S. Public Research University
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction - Historical Materialist Rhetoric and the Hermeneutics of Valuation 1
  • I 27
  • 1: Historicizing the U.S. Public Research University 29
  • 2: Monopoly Capitalism, Globalization, and University Transformation 74
  • II 125
  • 3: The Collusion of Economic and Cultural Systems 126
  • 4: The Rhetoric of University Missions 174
  • III 223
  • 5: Working-Class Professionalism 225
  • Notes 273
  • Works Cited 293
  • Index 319
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