Inside the Teaching Machine: Rhetoric and the Globalization of the U.S. Public Research University

By Catherine Chaput | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

1. Attempting to overcome this omission, McCloskey's most recent text, The Bourgeois Virtues, makes a grand apology for capitalism as virtuous and ethical as well as economically superior to other systems. This text is the first installment of what will be a three-part treatise on the virtues of capitalism.


Chapter 1

1. For good histories of the university, see Hofstadter and Smith's two-volume documentary history, Veysey's study of the emergence of the uniquely American university, Cohen's excellent synthesis and overview of U.S. higher education, Barrow's analysis of the relationship between U.S. universities and the capitalist state, and Graham and Diamond's study of the post–World War II struggle between private and public research universities.

2. Notice, for example, the plethora of new books that emerged in the 1990s detailing the failure of higher education to live up to its democratic professional ideal. Though these books may not specifically compare the current state of higher education to a mythical past, they do rely on a de facto mythology of U.S. higher education as a democratizing project. A quick glance at titles such as Education Still under Siege (1993), The Academy in Crisis (1995), The University in Ruins (1996), What's Happened to the Humanities? (1997), Will Teach for Food (1997), Academic Capitalism (1997), Failing the Future (1998), Capitalizing Knowledge (1998), and especially The Knowledge Factory (2000) reveals the implicit rhetoric of an earlier, more democratic university system. Notice, for instance, that words like “crisis” and “failing” point out our current educational misdirection. Also note the recurrence of phrases that link education to the marketplace: “capitalizing knowledge,” “knowledge factory,” and “academic capitalism.” These texts make important and persuasive arguments about the present university context, yet they do so through a rhetoric of crisis that

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Inside the Teaching Machine: Rhetoric and the Globalization of the U.S. Public Research University
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction - Historical Materialist Rhetoric and the Hermeneutics of Valuation 1
  • I 27
  • 1: Historicizing the U.S. Public Research University 29
  • 2: Monopoly Capitalism, Globalization, and University Transformation 74
  • II 125
  • 3: The Collusion of Economic and Cultural Systems 126
  • 4: The Rhetoric of University Missions 174
  • III 223
  • 5: Working-Class Professionalism 225
  • Notes 273
  • Works Cited 293
  • Index 319
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