Irish, Catholic and Scouse: The History of the Liverpool-Irish, 1800-1939

By John Belchem | Go to book overview
Save to active project

5
Electoral Politics:
Towards Home Rule

ELECTORAL POLITICS in Irish Liverpool underwent a diverse (at times bewildering) range of hyphenated political allegiance before the consolidation of 'Nat-Labism' in the years before the First World War. Taking account of recurrent socio-economic, generational and other tensions within a large migrant enclave over time, this chapter endeavours to chart the convoluted route, nearly but never entirely completed, from grateful dependence upon the Liberals to defant 'Home Rule' political independence. Alternative forms of extra-parliamentary nationalist politics, from the Confederates through the Fenians to the IRB, are considered in the next chapter.

The Liberal alignment had a venerable past stretching back to the campaigning days of Daniel O'Connell, the 'Liberator'. In seeking emancipation, Catholics identified with the Liberal project of civil and religious liberty, but this was called into question by subsequent defence of denominational education. On this recurrent point of tension, Catholics drew away from the Liberals and their increasingly vociferous Nonconformist secularist activists towards expedient clericalist alliance with Tory Anglicans. Similarly with Repeal of the Act of Union, there was a strong initial Liberal link, but the relationship was to be strained by subsequent elaboration of a distinctive form of Irish nationalism: faith-based and compatible with Catholic ultramontanism, it was anathema to British Liberal norms. Gladstonian Home Rule restored the old alignment but the Liberals' failure to deliver on the project strained the patience of the INP.

The INP developed into an efficient Parnellite electoral machine in Liverpool, able to challenge the Liberals and gain control of the north end of the city. A range of key supporters ensured a decent turn-out at the polls, the restrictive franchise and registration requirements which limited the party's electoral base among the 'poor Irish' notwithstanding: Irish lawyers, adept at adding names to

-121-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Irish, Catholic and Scouse: The History of the Liverpool-Irish, 1800-1939
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 372

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?