Irish, Catholic and Scouse: The History of the Liverpool-Irish, 1800-1939

By John Belchem | Go to book overview

11
The Liverpool-Irish
and the Irish Revolution

THE COMPLEX SUCCESSION of events in Ireland between 1916 and 1923, conveniently condensed by Peter Hart into the single heading of 'revolution'—a rising, an election, a war of independence (with various alternate names), a truce, a treaty, another election and then a civil war —elicited a bewildering array of responses in Irish Liverpool.1 The various forms of expatriate nationalist activity and expression were all apparent in accentuated form, reinvigorated and fused in a 'revolutionary' compound of competing, occasionally complementary, elements. Having played a relatively minor participatory role in the Easter Rising, the Liverpool-Irish revolutionary underground came to the fore in the Irish wars, drawing upon lengthy experience, stretching back beyond Fenian times, of gun-running, rescue and refuge, simultaneous and diversionary activity. Separatist republican forms of politics, previously overshadowed by repeal and Home Rule formulations, gained new purchase through the Irish Self-Determination League and its first national president, the former Harfordite P.J. Kelly. Co-ordinated and energised by the Council of Irish Societies, there was a resurgence of cultural nationalism with aims and aspirations beyond the ethnic purity and stultifying censorship of the Edwardian years. Thus, there was over-arching cover for underground and other forms of 'revolutionary' activism, including a significant female contribution through the Cumann na mBan. Throughout all this, however, T.P. O'Connor and the INP, seemingly relics of the pre-revolutionary past, consolidated their electoral hold, but with little prospect either of extending their resonance beyond the Liverpool-Irish enclave or of long-term political survival once the 'revolution' in Ireland had run its course.

1 Peter Hart, The I.R.A. at War 1916-1923, Oxford, 2003, pp.3-29.

-263-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Irish, Catholic and Scouse: The History of the Liverpool-Irish, 1800-1939
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Tables vi
  • List of Abbreviations vii
  • Acknowledgements viii
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction: 'A Piece Cut of from the Old Sod Itself' 1
  • Part One - 1800–1914 25
  • 1: Poor Paddy 27
  • 2: 'the Lowest Depth' 56
  • 3: The Holy Sanctity of Poverty 70
  • 4: Faith and Fatherland 95
  • 5: Electoral Politics 121
  • 6: Extra-Parliamentary Politics 157
  • 7: 'Pat-Riot-Ism' 186
  • 8: Cultural Politics 198
  • 9: Leisure: Irish Recreation 216
  • Part Two - 1914–39 247
  • 10: The First World War 249
  • 11: The Liverpool-Irish and the Irish Revolution 263
  • 12: Depression, Decline and Heritage Recovery 297
  • Bibliography 324
  • Index 351
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 372

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.